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Used and In Stock Sails

Use the links below to browse through our inventory of used mainsails, headsails, spinnakers, hardware, and sail accessories.

If something catches your eye you can use our Used Sail Quote Form below to get in touch or call us at 1-888-958-5638 . Make sure to tell us the luff, leech, and foot measurements of the sail you are looking for. All prices are in USD and all sales are final. Refunds or returns are only available if the dimensions or descriptions of the sail are inaccurate.

Don’t see a used sail that will fit quite right? Get a quote for a new sail . It’s quick and easy and our prices may surprise you.

Used Headsail and Mainsail Inventory for Sale

Don’t let a torn sail or expensive repairs keep you from sailing.

Spring is here and now is the time to get an updated quote for up to 30% off! New sails have never been easier to replace your existing sail with!

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Browse Our Used Sails

Used mainsails

Used Mainsails

Browse through our in stock selection of used mainsails at affordable prices. Many of our used mainsails are still in great condition!

Used In Stock Head Sails

Used Headsails

Browse through our in stock selection of used headsails at affordable prices. Many of our used headsails are still in great condition!

Used Spinnakers

Used Spinnakers

Browse through our in stock selection of used spinnakers at affordable prices. Many of our used spinnakers are still in great condition!

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Used Hardware & Accessories

Look for used sail accessories through our in stock selection of used hardware & accessories. You can also check out our store for more great deals on sailing gear!

Request Information on Used vs New Sails

Once you’ve found the used sail that you want to buy, or you’re curious about the differences between buying used vs new, click here and our team will get in touch with you about the next steps for your used sails purchase!

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Thanks for telling us a bit about yourself and your boat. Our team will send you a preliminary quote based on information we have gathered from sailors similar to you.

We will give you a call in order to narrow down the options on your quote and improve the accuracy. If you want us to call you at a specific time, feel free to schedule a time on our calendar!

Thanks for telling us a bit about yourself and your boat. Our team will reach out to offer some suggestions and get started on finding you the perfect sail!


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A Full Guide to The Jib Sail And How To Use It

Most cruising boats today have a sail plan consisting of at least three sails: A mainsail, a headsail, and a light-wind sail.

The Jib sail (along with its sister, the Genoa) is one of the most widely used headsails on modern sailboats in combination with a larger mainsail. It is very versatile and easy to use in different configurations throughout most weather conditions. 

In this article, I want to explain the Jib in detail and talk a bit about how it works and how we rig and trim it to get the most performance out of the boat. I’ll also show you each part of the sail and its materials before explaining how it differs from other headsails like the Genoa .

Finally, I’ll finish with some tips on maintaining the sail properly to make sure it last as long as possible.

Well, shall we get started?

What is a Jib sail, and what do we use it for?

The Jib is a triangular sail that does not overlap the mainsail. It is typically between 100% and 115% of the foretriangle size and is commonly seen on modern vessels with fractional rigs.

The foretriangle is the triangular area formed by the mast, deck, and forestay. Learn more terms here .

Like other headsails, the Jib is usually rigged on a furling system attached to the forestay , making it easy to operate. The Jib can also be rigged with a self-tacking system, making upwind sailing easy for you, whether you want to cruise solo or with your friends.

How the Jib works on a sailboat

The Jib provides a sail area forward of the mast, allowing the boat to be steered and balanced effectively.

The curved shape of the sail creates a pressure differential. The outer, more convex side (leeward side) has a lower pressure than the inner, concave side (windward side). This pressure differential generates lift, which translates into forward propulsion, much like how an airplane wing produces lift. 

How to rig a Jib

You can rig the Jib on either a furling system or directly to the forestay. Most modern sailing boats are equipped with a furling system, which is a long sleeve that runs from the top of the mast down to the bow and attaches to a drum on the bottom and a swivel on the top. 

Take a closer look at this step-by-step process on how to rig the Jib to sail onto a furling system:

  • Feed the Jib’s luff into the track on the furler’s sleeve with the top of the sail first and connect the head ring on the sail to the chackle on the swivel.
  • Attach the Jib halyard to the swivel and hoist the sail up. 
  • When the sail is hoisted almost all the way to the top, you attach the sail’s tack to a shackle on the top of the drum. 
  • Put the halyard on a winch and winch it tight.
  • Now you have to manually roll up the sail around the forestay and tie on the two sheets to the clew of the sail.
  • Lead the two sheets on each side of the vessel’s side decks through the sheet cars, turn blocks, and back to the winches.
  • Now that the sail is furled away, we need to tie the furling line onto the drum. You have to figure out how the furling line attaches, as it differs from system to system.
  • Once the furler line is attached to the drum, ensure that it can wrap itself up freely.
  • Pull the sail back out using one of your sheets and monitor that the furling line wraps on nicely.
  • Leed the furling line through the blocks and funnels, through the jammer , and leave it next to the winch.
  • Furl the sail away again using the furling line and ensure that the sheets run freely as you monitor your sail getting wrapped nicely around the forestay.
  • Secure the furler line jammer and tidy up your two sheets. Make sure to secure the sheets around the winches.

So, you see now why most boats use furling systems? It is easy! Many larger sailboats even have electrical furlers, removing the need for the furling line.

How to use, reef, and trim a Jib

To use the Jib, you wrap the furler line around the winch, open the jammer, and pull on either of the sheets, depending on which tack you are sailing on. You should hold on to the furler line to prevent the sail from unfurling itself uncontrollably, especially in strong winds. Trying to catch it if it starts running can injure your hands, so be careful! I’m speaking from experience here; burned hands are “No bueno.”

You can now unfurl the entire sail or a part of it. Once the full sail, or the amount you desire, is out, adjust your car position and tighten the sheet.

How to reef a jib

You do the opposite as the above to reef the sail or furl it back in. 

Ease off the working sheet, but keep it on the winch. At the same time, pull in on the furler line either manually or on the winch. Remember to move the cars forward and re-tighten the sheet if you are reefing away only a part of the Jib. 

How to trim a jib

Adjusting the sheet cars and sheet tension is important to obtain an optimal sail shape in the Jib. Finding this balance is what we call  sail trim . I’m not going too deep into sail trim here, as it is a topic for itself, which will require a separate article,.

But here is a rule of thumb:

You want the leech and foot of the sail to form an even “U” shape on any point of sail . When sailing upwind, you usually move the car aft. When bearing off the wind, you move the car forward.

The goal is to apply even tension on both the foot and the leech. When you reef the sail, you’ll also want to move the car forward to adjust for the reduced sail area. Sailing downwind doesn’t require the same fine-tuning as upwind sailing.

Four tips for sailing upwind:

  • Winch up the jib sheet until the leech stops fluttering and the foot has a nice, even “U” shape. 
  • You must move the sheet car forward if the foot is tight and the leech flutters.
  • Move the sheet cars aft if the leech is tight and the foot flutters .
  • If the wind increases and the boat starts to heel excessively, you can either ease off the sheet or adjust your course more head to wind. 

You should play around and experiment with sail trim, as every boat behaves differently. Trimming sails is an art that takes time to master. Staysails, Jibs, and Genoas are trimmed the same way, but the car positions will be different due to their size and shape differences. Once you learn how to trim a Jib, you’ll be able to trim any headail and even a storm jib or a spinnaker.

Sailing with more than one Jib

Sailing with multiple jib sails can be beneficial on longer downwind passages. Most furling systems have two tracks, allowing you to have two Jibs on the same furler, making this setup easy to reef. You can do the same with Yankees and Genoas, depending on what you have available in your boat.

Some sailboats have two or more forestays, allowing them to have two individually furled Jibs. This is usually called a cutter rig. Most Cutter rigs, however, use a Staysail on the inner forestay and a Yankee sail on the outer, but this versatile rig allows you to experiment with many setups.

Exploring the different parts of the Jib

Head: The head is the top corner of the Jib. It typically has a ring in the top corner that attaches to the Jib halyard or the top swivel for furling systems.

Leech: The leech is the aft part of the rib, located between the clew and head. 

Luff : A Jib’s luff is the front part between the tack and head. Jibs can be equipped with  luff foam  to help maintain their shape when partially reefed on a furler.

Clew : The clew is the aft lower corner of the jib where the sheets are attached.

Tack : The tack is the lower, forward corner of the Jib. The tack is connected to a furler drum on the forestay on most sailboats. Vessels using traditional hank-on headsails connect the tack to a fixed point on the bow.

Foot : The foot of the Jib is the bottom portion of the sail between the clew and the tack.

Telltales: Telltales are small ropes, bands, or flags attached to the front of the Jib’s leech to help us understand how the wind affects the sail and allow us to fine-tune the trim for optimal performance.

Commonly used materials for the Jib

The most common material used for Jib’s today is Dacron woven polyester, followed by CDX laminate due to the relatively affordable price. Continuing up the range, we find woven hybrids like Hydranet, Vectran, Radian, and other brands.

Then, we have advanced laminates with Aramids, carbon, kevlar, and more exotic materials. At the top of the spectrum, we find the latest technology in DFi membrane sails like Elvstrøms EPEX or North Sails 3Di, which comes at a premium price tag.

These days, however, modern technology has given us warp-oriented woven cloth, which is becoming a popular option due to its increased ability to keep shape over time without stretching as much as traditionally cross-cut dacron sails. ProRadial, made by Contender and Dimension Polyant, is a good example. North Sails has an excellent article that goes in-depth on sail materials.

The difference between a Jib and a Genoa

The difference between a Jib and a Genoa is that the Jib is a headsail that does not overlap the mainsail, while the larger Genoa is designed to overlap the mainsail. While the smaller Jib is excellent at pointing upwind and easier to handle, the larger Genoa excels on any points of sail with the wind behind the beam.

Genoas are usually larger than 115% of the  foretriangle , with sizes ranging from 120% to 150%. They are often used on yachts with masthead rigs and smaller mainsails but are also common on fractional rigs.

How to Maintain and Care for Your Jib Sail

Good maintenance and care of your Jib will ensure optimal performance and minimize wear and tear. Check out these tips on how to maintain and protect your Jib:

  • Rinse the Jib with fresh water regularly and leave it up to dry before packing it away. Proper drying will prevent moisture and mildew.
  • Give the sail a service once a year. Check for any damaged seams and repair them if necessary. If there are any chafing marks, reinforce the sail with patches on chafe points and add shafe guards to the equipment it rubs against.
  • Protect the sail from UV rays by keeping it packed away when not in use. A furling Jib can be protected by adding a UV strip to the foot and leech.

I also wrote an article on how to make sails last longer .

Final Words

We have talked a lot about the Jib’s features and how it works in this article. I recommend you to head out and set sail to get some experience and play around with your sails. If you don’t have a boat, chat around in your nearest marina; someone will for sure bring you along for a sail. I know I would.

Remember to experiment with sail trim and practice tacking and maneuvering the vessel with the sail on both the port and starboard sides.

If you still have questions, check out the frequently asked questions section below or drop a comment in the comment field. I’ll be more than happy to answer any of your questions!

PS: Explore more sails in my easy guide to different types of sails here .

FAQ – The Jib Sail Explained

When to use a jib sail.

The Jib is an excellent sail for most conditions, especially when cruising at any angle towards the wind. The Jib has a benefit over the Genoa in strong winds as it is easier to handle, and its smaller size makes it more effective than a reefed Genoa when sailing to windward. 

Can you sail with just the Jib?

It is possible to sail with just the Jib alone, and it works exceptionally well downwind on deep angles where the mainsail usually would have blocked off the wind. 

Can you sail upwind with just the jib?

It is possible to sail upwind with just the Jib, but most sailboat owners prefer to balance their boats by flying their mainsail combined with theiJib when sailing to windward.

What is the difference between a Genoa and a Jib?

The Genoa is different from a Jib sail as it is larger and overlaps the mainsail, whereas the Jib is smaller and does not overlap the mainsail.

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Skipper, Electrician and ROV Pilot

Robin is the founder and owner of Sailing Ellidah and has been living on his sailboat since 2019. He is currently on a journey to sail around the world and is passionate about writing his story and helpful content to inspire others who share his interest in sailing.

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Home » Blog » Gear » Buying used sails (a complete guide to buying second-hand sails)

Buying used sails (a complete guide to buying second-hand sails)

By Author Fiona McGlynn

Posted on Last updated: August 18, 2023

If you’re looking into buying a set of used sails, you’ve probably realized just how expensive brand-new sails can be.

Fortunately, you can buy used sails (that are still in good condition) for very affordable prices. Potentially saving yourself thousands of dollars.

Finding a good deal on a used sail that fits your boat is just a matter of knowing how and where to look.

In this guide we’ll cover:

  • How much do used sails cost (and are they worth it)?
  • How (and where) to find great deals on used sails.

Cost-saving tip: Did you know you can also save money by buying used boat parts ?

Table of contents

  • 1.1 Do used sails save you money over the long run?
  • 1.2 What about performance?
  • 1.3 What about all those ugly stains?
  • 2.1 Used sail types
  • 2.2 Used sail features
  • 2.3 Take your sail measurements
  • 2.4 Where to buy second hand sails

used sail

How much do used sails cost?

While pricing varies by size, material, and condition, you can expect to spend a fraction of the price that you would on a set of new custom sails.

As an example, when we were preparing our Dufour 35 for bluewater cruising, we spent $5,000 on a brand-new main and genoa (a hefty chunk out of our cruising budget).

I recently priced out a similar set of used sails in good condition and came to a total of $1,200. That’s a 76% savings!

Do used sails save you money over the long run?

You might be wondering if a used sailboat sail will save you money over the long run. After all, used sails are “used” and presumably don’t have as much life left in them.

As sails age, they lose both their shape and structural integrity. They gradually stretch which makes them less efficient airfoils and impacts performance. They also become more prone to tearing as the material degrades.

Imagine paying $1,200 for used sails that only last one season. You would have been much better off spending $5,000 on new sails that last 10 or more seasons (i.e., $500 per season).

So, when you’re shopping for a used sailboat sail, it’s important to look closely at how the used sails are rated.

Most sail brokers have ranking systems that describe their sails as being anywhere from “Like new” to “Good” to “Useable”. These rankings can differ from broker to broker.

So, to find out if my $1,200 sail set ranked as “good” is still a good deal, let’s take a closer look.

We’ll use Atlantic Sail Trader’s used sail ranking system as an example:

  • Fair – 45-50% of life left
  • Good – 70-80% of life left
  • Very Good – over 90% of life left

If my sails cost $5,000 new (with 100% life left), you’d think that a “good” set with 75% life left should cost should cost $3,750. Instead, I found them for $1,200.

So, in reality, you’re saving more like 68%, which still seems like a good deal.

Used mainsail and used genoa

What about performance?

It’s worth pointing out, that sails have two “lives”:

An ultimate life: how long it will stay in one piece. Never use a sail for so long that it risks breaking while underway.

A performance life: how long it will retain an aerodynamic shape, allowing you to point higher and sail faster.

A sail’s performance life is generally shorter than its ultimate life. How much shorter, depends on the type of sailcloth.

According to North Sails , woven polyester sailcloth has a performance life that is less than half of its ultimate life. For cruising laminates these figures look to be more in the 70-75% range.

These numbers might sound dismaying, but it’s worth investigating what “performance” means and how much it matters to you.

In our experience, new sails were nice to have but not life-changing. They did noticeably improve our boat’s sailing performance, allowing us to point a bit higher and eke out a fraction of a knot more boat speed.

Whether or not this matters to you will depend on the type of sailing you’re doing.

If you’re a competitive racer, new sails might be quite critical, giving you that winning edge.

If you’re weekend cruising, they probably won’t make much of a difference, maybe getting you to your destination 10-15 minutes earlier on a half-day sail.

If you’re planning on doing bluewater cruising you may want to buy new, as we did, because we didn’t want to be faced with replacing our sails halfway through our trip. Or budget may be the determining factor, and a 50-80% savings is nothing to sneeze at.

used jib for sailboat

What about all those ugly stains?

Don’t let a few rust and mildew stains put you off buying a used sail. These stains are pretty common and aren’t necessarily indicative of a problem (though it might suggest the last owner didn’t clean their sails very often!).

With a few sail cleaning tricks you can greatly reduce the appearance of stains and brighten the overall appearance of your sail.

How to search for used sailboat sails

Before you start your search, you’ll want to have a clear idea of what you’re looking for. You’ll need to know:

  • What type of sail and features you’re looking for?
  • Your sailboat’s key rig measurements
  • Where to search for used sails (e.g., online marketplaces, sail brokers)

Used sail types

You’ll find a wide variety of sail types on the second-hand market. Here are some commonly available used sails:

  • Jib sails (triangular sail set forward of forwardmost mast)
  • Staysails (the innermost headsail on a cutter-rigged sailboat)
  • Genoas (a headsail that is large enough to overlap part of the mainsail)
  • A ll-purpose asymmetrical spinnakers (for sailing 80-150 degrees off the wind)
  • Symmetrical spinnakers (for sailing 110-180 degrees off the wind)
  • Code Zero (for sailing 40-110 degrees off the wind)

Used spinnaker

Used sail features

There are many options and features that affect a sail’s performance and longevity.

While you may not get everything you want in a used sail, understanding sail characteristics will help you narrow down your search.

Mainsail battens are flexible inserts, often made from fiberglass or vinyl, that help support the roach and improve the airfoil shape.

A standard mainsail has short battens but you can also get full battens which help reduce the flogging of a luffing sail and make it easier to stack the sail on the boom.

Roller furling headsails are common on the water today and you’ll find plenty of used options. Furling mainsails are also available second-hand if you happen to have a boom or mast that accepts a furling sail.

used jib for sailboat

Reef points allow you to reduce the size of your mainsail when the wind speed picks up. The more reef points you have, the more flexibility you have to adjust your sails to match the wind conditions.

Do you want a used mainsail with a single reef, deep reef, or even two or three reefs?

UV damages sailcloth, ultimately shortening the life of your sail. Sail covers are built-in and keep the headsail protected when it’s fully furled.

Some used sails come with a custom sail bag for storing your sail when it’s not in use.

Leech Lines and foot lines

Leech lines run along the leech, from the head of the sail to just above the clew.

Foot lines run from the tack to the clew along the foot of the sail.

Both lines are used to tension and reduce any fluttering in the edges of the sail.

Pro tip: Can’t find all the features you’re looking for? You can pay your local sail loft to make alterations or even do it yourself with a basic sail repair kit .

sail repair kit

Used sail materials

Woven polyester.

Most of the used sail market consists of woven polyester, a material known for being affordable, durable, and reliable. It’s often called dacron, in reference to the DuPont trade name.

Charter companies expect to change out their dacron sails every two to three years or 1500 to 2500 hours . For the average weekend cruiser, this might amount to 10 years of serviceable life.

used jib for sailboat

Laminated sails

Laminated sails are a step up from dacron. They tend to be lighter and hold their shape longer, though generally aren’t as long-lived ( expect 5-7 years ).

Laminated sails are made by combining a load-carrying fiber (e.g., polyester, aramid, Spectra/Dyneema, carbon, or a mix) with a laminate (e.g., Mylar film).

You may find a few used laminated sails on the second-hand market place but they’re not as common as dacron. They also tend to be pricier.

Nylon is a lightweight and low-cost fabric commonly used in spinnakers.

Cruising World has a good overview of sail materials if you’re looking to get into the nitty gritty.

Material weight

When choosing a sail, you’ll have to choose a material weight that’s appropriate for your boat’s size and displacement.

For instance, a 20-foot boat might use a 5 oz Dacron mainsail, but a 50-foot boat might use a 10 oz Dacron mainsail.

From there, you’ll be looking to balance how easily the sail fills in light winds with the sail’s longevity. Generally speaking, heavy sails will last longer while lighter sails are better for sailing in light air.

used jib for sailboat

Take your sail measurements

The most important step in used sale shopping is getting accurate measurements.

At some point, you’ll need to hoist your sails and take detailed measurements of your rig. You can work with your sail broker or use this downloadable sail measuring guide from Sailrite.

However, to start your search, you only need to know four basic rig and sail dimensions.

Quick search tip

If you’re just looking to get a rough idea of used sail pricing and availability, you can look up rig measurements (I, J, P, E) for your boat on SailboatData.com and input these into the used sail websites listed at the bottom of this post.

Remember, it’s CRITICAL that you take hoisted measurements before ordering a used sail as your boat’s rig measurements may differ from those on SailboatData.com.

For example, your boat may have a tall rig, or a previous owner may have made alterations to the spars, stays, or added a roller furler. All of these may impact your rig measurements.

Used sails measurements

Mainsail measurements

Luff length (p).

Hook the end of your tape measure onto your main halyard (alongside your old sail) and hoist it right up to the top of the mast. Then measure to the top of the boom to get your maximum luff length.

Leech length

While you’ve got your tape measure hoisted, take the other end and measure to the end of the boom where you want your clew ring will be.

Lastly, measure from where the tack of the sail attaches at the front of the boom back to the farthest back point where you could attach the clew. This will be your maximum foot dimension.

Luff attachment

Depending on how your luff attaches to the mast (e.g., slides, slugs, rope luff) you’ll need to know the width of your existing track or slot. However, it’s fairly easy to add or change out slugs and slides if you can’t find a used sail that will fit your mast track.

Headsail measurements

Luff length.

Hoist the end of your tape measure up to the top of the mast with your jib halyard. Measure down the forestay to the deck. If you have a roller furling headsail, you’ll attach the tape measure to the top spindle and hoist it up. Measure down to the top of the furling drum.

I dimension

With the tape hoisted up the mast, measure straight down to the deck.

J dimension

Lastly, measure from where the forestay connects to the bow back to the base of the mast.

If you have a roller furling system, you’ll also need to measure the diameter of the luff tape, the small cord on the luff of the sail that serves as the attachment point to the roller furling system.

used jib for sailboat

Luff Perpendicular (LP%)

Have you ever heard someone mention a percentage when talking about a headsail (e.g., 135% or 150%)? They’re referring to the sails LP% or Luff Perpendicular percentage , which describes a headsail’s size/overlap relative to a boat’s J dimension.

The LP is the shortest perpendicular line from the clew to the luff.

The LP% is the LP divided by the J dimension (measurement along the deck from forestay to mast)

LP / J * 100

Deciding what LP% you want, will depend on a few factors including:

  • Where you sail. In an area like Vancouver Island, British Columbia, where summer winds are often light, you may want to opt for a higher LP% than if you were in San Francisco Bay, where the winds blow more consistently.
  • Racing or cruising. If you race, your LP% will likely be determined by race regulations. Most cruisers and weekend sailors opt for an LP% in the 135% range which offers plenty of flexibility for moderate sailing conditions.
  • Rig. It’s important to balance your headsail with your mainsail and ensure that your track position can accommodate the sail you’re interested in. If you’re buying a used sail that is considerably different from your existing one, you may want to contact one of the used sail brokers below for help with fine-tuning your setup.

used jib for sailboat

Fine-tuning

Remember that these measurements are just a starting point to help you narrow down your search.

There may be other factors to consider:

  • Do you have a masthead or fractionally rigged boat?
  • Will a new headsail be balanced with your old mainsail?
  • Will your new sail work with your existing track position, furling system, and clew heights?
  • Will you need to make adaptations like installing a pennant or spacer?

Once you’ve narrowed down your search to a few sails, contact a sail broker (see below) and they can give you tailored advice for your particular situation.

used jib for sailboat

Where to buy second hand sails

Online marketplaces.

eBay has a wide assortment of used boat sails. You may also have luck finding a good deal on a used sail on Craigslist or Kijiji.

One downside to these marketplaces is that you’re buying sails from the original owner, who may not provide precise measurements and likely won’t be an expert in sails.

Used sail brokers

Several stores specialize in selling used sails. They all vary in how they present their inventory. Some have retail locations, though you’ll find far more selection if you’re willing to shop online.

Some used sail websites offer better or more services than others.

  • Most sail broker websites allow you to search by luff length, rig dimensions, or boat make and model (though user experience and ease of navigation vary!).
  • Some companies will take your old sails on consignment and give you credit towards your new purchase.
  • Some sail brokers will make alterations to your sail for a small fee before sending it to you.
  • Many have return policies or satisfaction guarantees, though you may be required to pay for return shipping.

Minney’s Yacht Surplus in Costa Mesa, California is a must-visit for cruisers sailing down the coast. Not only do they have the largest new and used sail inventory on the West Coast, but they also offer a huge assortment of used boat parts. Their sail list is available on their website.

All sails are priced under $2,000 and sold on approval. So, if it’s shipped to you and you decide it isn’t suitable, you can return it within five days.

used jib for sailboat

Second Wind Sails started out serving the sailing community in Ft. Lauderdale, Florida, and has since expanded internationally. You can search their site by sail type, luff dimension, and foot dimensions. If they don’t currently have a sail that fits your needs, you can sign up to be notified by email when future sails match your search. For every sail they sell, they offer a 100% satisfaction guarantee.

Atlantic Sail Traders has been supplying sailors with new and used sails since 1985. They have thousands of new and used sails for sale including mains, jibs, genoas, spinnakers, mizzens, drifters, and storm sails. They’ll even take your old sails in on a trade towards a new or used sail or sell them outright for a 50% commission.

Bacon Sails has an extensive database of used sails and have been sail brokers since 1959. It’s very convenient to search their database because you only need to specify your boat’s make, model, and desired sail type. Though you’ll want to confirm your rig specs before finalizing your order.

Sail Exchange is based in Australia but ships worldwide for a flat rate of $99. They have a wide selection of used sails for sale and, unlike many other websites, each listing includes a photo of the sail in question. They also offer a 30-day 100% money-back guarantee. If you want to trade in your old sails, they’ll give you 15% off a new sail (of a similar size). They also sell used spars, sail bags, and other rigging.

Masthead Sailing Gear has a page where you can search for used sails by luff dimension.

Fiona McGlynn

Fiona McGlynn is an award-winning boating writer who created Waterborne as a place to learn about living aboard and traveling the world by sailboat. She has written for boating magazines including BoatUS, SAIL, Cruising World, and Good Old Boat. She’s also a contributing editor at Good Old Boat and BoatUS Magazine. In 2017, Fiona and her husband completed a 3-year, 13,000-mile voyage from Vancouver to Mexico to Australia on their 35-foot sailboat.

Douglas McQuilken

Sunday 1st of May 2022

Another comprehensive, informative article. When replacing your sails keep the older out of the landfill. Go green and trade them in at https://seabags.com/ . (I am not affiliated)

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Used Headsails

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SAILS THAT AREN’T ON THE LIST YET: Capri 26 155% race - UK tapedrive - good condition C&C 36 furling genoa - Schurr Sails - good condition Island 17 Jib - Schurr Sails - brand new Tartan 3500 furling genoa - Neil Pryde - fair condition Tatran 3500 drifter - Schurr Sails - excelent condition

Furling 155% Genoa - Beneteau 49 - Good Condition  -  $1,200 Luff:  54' 6"     Leech:  53' 6"     Foot:  29' 6"     LP:  28' 6"     Weight/Cloth:  8.0 oz./Dacron     Loft:  Schurr Sails     Shipping Weight:  84# Notes: Navy Blue Sunbrella on starboard side, #5 luff tape for Profurl, #52 in black, Triradial panel layout, 2008 Part Number:  H258

Genoa - Beneteau 49 - Fair Condition - $800 Luff: 54’ 4” Leech: 53’ 3” Foot: 29’ 1” LP: 28’ 2” Weight/Cloth: 9 oz./Dacron Loft: Schurr Sails Shipping Weight: 95# Notes: Navy sunbrella UV cover, #5 luff tape Part Number: H415

Genoa - Beneteau 45 - New Condition - $1,900 Luff: 53’ 7” Leech: 50’ 10” Foot: 20’ 6” LP: 19’ 6” Weight/Cloth: 9.7oz/Proradial Dacron Loft: Schurr Shipping Weight: 82# Notes: Triradial panel layout, #6 luff tape, cadet grey Sunbrella UV cover, brand new sail Part Number: H436

Screacher - Catana 43 - Fair Condition - $1,000 Luff: 50’ 6” Leech: 44’ 2” Foot: 29’ LP: 25’ 8” Weight/Cloth: Polyester/Mylar laminate Loft: Schurr Shipping Weight: 65# Notes: Wire luff; Red Sunbrella UV cover, port side Part Number: H441

Genoa - Jenneau Sun Odyseey 440 - Good Condition - $1,800 SOLD SOLD Luff: 48’ 6” Leech: 46’ 1” Foot: 21’ LP: 20’ 1” Weight/Cloth: 9 oz./Dacron Loft: Elvstrom Shipping Weight: 50# Notes: #5 luff tape; white Sunbrella UV cover, starboard side Part Number: H462 SOLD SOLD

Genoa - Catalina 36 - New Condition - $2,600 Luff: 42’ 6” Leech: 41’ 1” Foot: 19’ 4” LP: 18’ 8” Weight/Cloth: 7.5 oz./Dacron Loft: Schurr Shipping Weight: 50# Notes: Flattening foam luff pad, #6 tape on luff; reef reference marks; Azure (light blue) Sunbrella UV cover, starboard side Part Number: H450

Genoa - Sabre 30 - Fair Condition - $700 Luff: 40’ 32” Leech: 37’ 8” Foot: 19’ 5” LP: 18’ 3” Weight/Cloth: 6 oz./Dacron Loft: Doyle Shipping Weight: 28# Notes: #6 tape on luff; some stains on sail; old UV cover removed Part Number: H439

SOLD SOLD SOLD Genoa - Pearson 323 - Good Condition - $900 Luff: 38’ 10” Leech: 37’ 5” Foot: 21’ 11” LP: 20’ 9” Weight/Cloth: 6.5 oz./Dacron Loft: Schurr Shipping Weight: 45# Notes: #5 luff tape; Pacific blue Sunbrella UV cover, starboard side; foam luff pad; sail also comes with a set of sheets Part Number: H455 SOLD SOLD SOLD

Genoa - Newport 27 - Good Condition - $600 Luff: 34’ 9” Leech: 31’ 10” Foot: 18’ 6” LP: 17’ 5” Weight/Cloth: PX20/Polyester Loft: Schurr Shipping Weight: 25# Notes: Sail number 932 in blue - Hanks on luff, not set up for furling. Part Number: H419

Genoa - Good Condition - $400 Luff: 34’ 6” Leech: 31’ 2” Foot: 14’ 5” LP: 12’ 10” Weight/Cloth: 6oz./Dacron Loft: NA Shipping Weight: 20# Notes: Gemini luff tape, yellow seams Part Number: H414

Yankee - Cheoy Lee - Fair Condition - $400 SOLD SOLD Luff: 33’ 3” Leech: 25’ 2” Foot: 13’ 7” LP: 9’ 5” Weight/Cloth: 5.5oz./Dacron Loft: NA Shipping Weight: 20 Notes: Pacific blue Sunbrella UV cover on port side Part Number: H405 SOLD SOLD

Genoa - Dana 24 - Fair Condition - $400 Luff: 31’ 6” Leech: 25’ 4” Foot: 14’ 3” LP: 10’ 9” Weight/Cloth: 5.5oz./Dacron Loft: McKibbin Shipping Weight: 20# Notes: Hanks on luff, 1 reef Part Number: H400

Blade Headsail - Harmony 22 - Good Condition - $400 Luff: 30’ 3” Leech: 28’ 6” Foot: 9’ LP: 8’ 6” Weight/Cloth: 5.5oz./Dacron Loft: Schurr Shipping Weight: 15# Notes: Masthead, battens, hard cloth, mud stains, #5 luff tape Part Number: H204

Genoa - Custom - Fair Condition - $350 Luff: 29’ 5” Leech: 26’ 3” Foot: 14’ 7” LP: 13’ 4” Weight/Cloth: 5.5 oz/Dacron Loft: UK Sails Shipping Weight: 17# Notes: Pacific Blue Sunbrella UV cover, port side; #6 luff tape Part Number: H453

Genoa - Fair Condition - $400 Luff: 27’ 6” Leech: 24’ 11” Foot: 11’ 5” LP: 10’ 2” Weight/Cloth: 7oz./Dacron Loft: NA Shipping Weight: 15# Notes: Hanks on luff Part Number: H408

Jib - Good Condition - $600 Luff: 27’ 3” Leech: 25’ Foot: 8’ 6” LP: 7’ 11” Weight/Cloth: PX5/PX10 Blend Loft: Schurr Shipping Weight: 12# Notes: Hanks on luff; draft stripe; tell-tale window; 3 small leech battens Part Number: H444

Genoa - Good Condition - $300 Luff:  26' 7"      Leech:  27' 9"      Foot:  18' 9"      LP:  18' 2 "    Weight/Cloth:  5.5oz./Dacron  Loft:  NA Shipping Weight: 15# Notes: Hanks on luff, sail number “249” in black Part Number: H327

Yankee - Cheoy Lee - Fair Condition - $300 Luff: 22’ 1” Leech: 16’ 8” Foot: 10’ 9” LP: 8’ Weight/Cloth: 6oz./Dacron Loft: NA Shipping Weight: 15# Notes: Linen Sunbrella UV cover on port side Part Number: H411

Jib - Beach Cat - New Condition Luff: 19’ 4” Leech: 18’ 9” Foot: 5’ 11” Weight/Cloth: 5.5oz./Dacron Loft: Schurr Sails Shipping Weight: NA Notes: Call for pricing and further details Part Number: H329

Furling Jib - Hobie 17 - New Sail - $400 Luff: 17’ 3” Leech: 16’ 1” Foot: 7’ 10” LP: 7’ 4” Weight/Cloth: 6oz./Dacron Loft: Schurr Shipping Weight: 10# Notes: Sail is brand new, but was never picked up; zipper sleeve on luff; starboard white UV cover; vision window; sail is all white Part Number: H426

Jib - - Excellent Condition - $225 Luff: 16’ 7” Leech: 14’ 6” Foot: 7” LP: 6’ 3” Weight/Cloth: 6oz/Dacron Loft: Schurr Shipping Weight: 9# Notes: Old sail that has never been used; White Sunbrella UV cover starboard side; wire luff; leather at protection at head and tack, #0 hanks on luff Part Number: H438

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What’s a Sailboat Jib? (A Comprehensive Guide)

used jib for sailboat

Are you an experienced sailor looking to learn more about your sailboat? Or are you a beginner looking for a comprehensive guide to help you get started? If so, you’ve come to the right place! In this article, we’ll discuss the basics of sailboat jibs and how they help you sail smoothly and efficiently.

We’ll cover what a jib is, the purpose of a jib, the different types of jibs available, how to rig and trim a jib, the benefits of using a jib, and some tips for setting and trimming a jib.

Whether you’re a beginner or an experienced sailor, let’s get started learning more about sailboat jibs!

Table of Contents

Short Answer

A sailboat jib is a triangular sail that is set at the front of a sailboat.

It is usually attached to the forestay, a cable that runs from the bow of the boat to the mast.

The jib helps to balance the mainsail and increases the sailboat’s ability to sail close to the wind.

The jib is often the smallest sail on a sailboat and is often used for light air sailing.

What is a Sailboat Jib?

A sailboat jib is an essential part of any sailing vessel’s rig.

A jib is a triangular sail that is set at the front of the boat, usually between the mast and the bow.

It is the second most important sail on a sailboat and is typically used to help the boat turn and maneuver more efficiently.

The jib is an important part of a sailboat’s rig and is often used in combination with the mainsail to maximize the boat’s performance.

The jib is usually the first sail to be set up.

It is attached to the forestay, a line that runs from the bow of the boat to the mast.

The jib is adjusted to the desired angle and is held in place by a series of blocks that allow it to be adjusted to different angles.

The jib is also connected to the mast by a halyard, which is a rope that is used to raise and lower the sail.

The jib is an important part of sailing because it allows the boat to turn more efficiently.

The jib provides extra lift and power to the boat, which can be used to turn the boat more quickly and to increase the speed of the boat.

The jib also helps to balance the boat, allowing it to sail more smoothly and easily.

The jib also helps to improve the boat’s performance in light winds.

A boat with a jib will be able to sail in much lighter winds than a boat without one.

This is because the jib acts as a sort of “wing” that is able to catch the wind, allowing the boat to move forward even in light winds.

In conclusion, a sailboat jib is an essential part of any sailing vessel’s rig.

It is an important sail that helps to increase the boat’s performance, turning ability, and speed.

The jib also helps to balance the boat and allows it to sail in lighter winds.

A sailboat is not complete without a jib, and understanding how to properly rig and manage a jib is essential for any sailor.

What is the Purpose of a Jib?

used jib for sailboat

The purpose of a jib is to provide an additional source of power and lift as a sailboat moves through the water.

Unlike the mainsail, which is a large, open-ended sail attached to the mast, the jib is a triangular sail that is set at the front of the boat, usually between the mast and the bow.

This helps to make the boat more maneuverable and provides additional power in lighter winds or upwind sailing.

The jib also provides additional lift, which reduces the amount of drag created by the mainsail.

This can help a sailboat achieve higher speeds or sail closer to the wind.

Additionally, the jib can be used to balance the boat in different conditions, such as when sailing upwind or when beating into a strong wind.

In essence, the jib is an important part of a sailboat’s rig and is often used in combination with the mainsail to maximize the boat’s performance.

Types of Sailboat Jibs

When it comes to sailboat jibs, there are several different types that you can choose from depending on your needs. The most common types of sailboat jibs are: Genoa jibs, cutter jibs, overlapping jibs, and non-overlapping jibs.

Genoa jibs are the largest type of sailboat jib and are often used on larger sailboats.

They are typically used in combination with a mainsail to help maximize the boat’s performance.

Genoa jibs provide the most power and are usually used in light to moderate wind conditions.

Cutter jibs are a type of jib that is designed for smaller sailboats.

They are typically used in combination with a mainsail to help the boat maneuver more efficiently.

Cutter jibs are usually used in moderate to strong winds and offer less power than Genoa jibs.

Overlapping jibs, as the name suggests, overlap with the mainsail when deployed.

These sails are usually used in light-moderate winds and provide more power than cutter jibs.

Non-overlapping jibs, also known as headsails, are the most common type of jib used on sailboats.

These sails are usually used in moderate to strong winds and provide the most power when compared to the other types of jibs.

Finally, there are also asymmetrical spinnakers, which are specialized sails that are designed to help the boat reach higher speeds.

These sails are typically used in combination with a mainsail and jib to help the boat reach maximum speed.

Asymmetrical spinnakers are usually used in moderate to strong winds and provide the most power when compared to the other types of jibs.

No matter what type of sailboat jib you choose, you’re sure to enjoy the increased performance that it provides.

With the right combination of mainsail and jib, you’ll be able to maximize your boat’s performance and have a great day on the water.

How to Rig a Jib

used jib for sailboat

Rigging a jib is an important step in ensuring a successful sailing experience.

It requires some knowledge of sailing terminology and techniques, but once the basics are understood, it can be done quickly and efficiently.

The first step in rigging a jib is to select the appropriate size for your sailboat.

The size of the jib should be based on the size of your boat and the type of sailing you plan to do.

For example, a larger jib will be more effective when sailing in strong winds, while a smaller jib is better suited for lighter winds.

Once you have determined the size of the jib, you can begin the rigging process.

First, attach the jib halyard, which is the line used to hoist the sail, to the head of the jib.

Next, attach the jib sheets, which are the lines used to control the trim of the jib, to the clew of the jib.

Finally, attach the jib tack, which is the line used to attach the jib to the bow of the boat, to the bow.

Once the jib is rigged, you can begin to adjust the trim of the sail.

To do this, you will need to adjust the tension on the jib sheets.

If the tension is too loose, the jib will not be able to fill with wind properly and you will lose power.

On the other hand, if the tension is too tight, the sail will be over trimmed and you will sacrifice performance.

Finally, you can adjust the angle of the jib in relation to the wind to maximize the power of the sail.

This is known as jibing, and it involves adjusting the angle of the sail in relation to the wind so that the wind is hitting the sail at the optimal angle.

This will maximize the power of the sail and help you turn more efficiently.

Rigging a jib is an important part of sailing, and when done correctly, it can make a huge difference in your sailing performance.

With a little knowledge and practice, you can quickly and easily rig your jib to maximize the power of your sailboat.

How to Trim a Jib

When it comes to sailing, the jib is an important part of the boats rig.

It is a triangular sail set at the front of the boat, usually between the mast and the bow.

The jib helps the boat turn and maneuver more efficiently, and is often used in combination with the mainsail to maximize the boats performance.

But before you can use the jib to its full potential, you need to know how to trim it properly.

Trimming a jib is a delicate process, as the sail needs to be adjusted in order to capture the right amount of wind.

To do this, you will need to adjust the angle of the sail relative to the boat, as well as the tension of the sail itself.

The angle of the sail should be adjusted so that it is parallel to the wind direction.

As the wind direction changes, so should the angle of the sail.

In order to adjust the tension of the sail, you will need to use the jib sheet.

This is a line that connects the jib to the boat and is used to adjust the sails tension.

By releasing or tightening the jib sheet, you can adjust the amount of tension on the sail, allowing it to capture the right amount of wind.

When it comes to trimming the jib, it is important to remember that the sail needs to be adjusted in order to maximize the boats performance.

Adjusting the angle of the sail and the tension of the sail will help you capture the right amount of wind and will ensure that you are getting the most out of your boat.

With a little practice and patience, you can become an expert at trimming a jib.

Benefits of Using a Jib

used jib for sailboat

A sailboat jib can be an incredibly useful addition to your boats rigging.

It helps the boat turn more efficiently, allowing the boat to be maneuvered with greater precision.

The jib also adds stability in windy conditions, helping to reduce the risk of capsizing.

Additionally, a jib will provide additional power while sailing, allowing you to make quicker progress, particularly in light winds.

Finally, having a jib can help to reduce the stress on your mainsail, extending its life and reducing the need for frequent repairs.

In addition to providing more power, a jib can also be used to adjust the course of the boat.

For example, when sailing close-hauled (on a close reach with the wind coming from directly ahead), the jib can be used to increase the boats speed and turn it more quickly.

This is especially useful when tacking or jibing.

Using a jib also helps to reduce drag on the boat, allowing it to move faster and more efficiently.

This is especially important for racers, who need to maximize their boats performance in order to gain an edge over their competitors.

Finally, using a jib can help to reduce the overall weight of the boat, making it easier to maneuver and store.

This is especially useful for smaller boats, which may not have enough room to store a large mainsail.

Tips for Setting and Trimming a Jib

When it comes to sailing, a well-executed jib can make or break the success of the voyage. Setting and trimming the jib is essential for the boat to reach its full potential on the water. Here are some tips for setting and trimming a jib:

1. Before setting the jib, make sure the boat is properly balanced by adjusting the traveler and outhaul. This will help to ensure the jib is set correctly.

2. When setting the jib, make sure to keep the jib sheet tensioned and the jib luff taut. This will help to ensure the jib is properly aligned with the wind and the boat will move forward efficiently.

3. When trimming the jib, make sure to adjust the sheet tension to keep the jib luff taut. This will help to maintain the jibs alignment with the wind and maximize the boats performance.

4. When sailing in light winds, it can be beneficial to use a smaller jib to reduce drag. This will help to keep the boat moving forward in light conditions.

5. Lastly, it is important to remember to furl the jib in strong winds. This will help to reduce the sail area and keep the boat under control in heavy winds.

These tips should help sailors to get the most out of their jib when sailing.

With the right setup and trim, a jib can be an essential part of a successful sailing voyage.

Final Thoughts

A sailboat jib is an important part of a sailboat’s rig and can help to maximize the boat’s performance.

It is a triangular sail that is typically set between the mast and the bow.

It is important to understand the purpose of a jib, the different types of jibs available, and how to rig and trim a jib.

With knowledge of these basics, sailors will be able to make the most out of their sailboats jib and enjoy a more efficient sailing experience.

So, start sailing with more confidence and get to know your jib today!

James Frami

At the age of 15, he and four other friends from his neighborhood constructed their first boat. He has been sailing for almost 30 years and has a wealth of knowledge that he wants to share with others.

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What Is The Jib Sail On A Sailboat?

The jib sail is the triangular-shaped sail that flies forward of the sailboat mast . Jibs can come in all different shapes and sizes, making them fit for a variety of purposes, so they’re important sails to have on a sailboat.

This article will help educate sailors on understanding the purpose and benefits of having a jib sail. We’ll also go over some tips for keeping it in great condition so your sails are always ready for a voyage.

If you’re looking to understand more about the intricacies of your boat then read on to find out all about your jib sail.

Armed with this knowledge, you’ll be prepared for any offshore adventure!

The jib on a sailboat

Table Of Contents

What is the jib sail, why is a jib called a jib, do you need a jib to sail, can you sail with jib only, how do you trim a jib sail, different parts of a jib sail, how do you reef a jib, can a sailboat have multiple jib sails, jib sail materials.

a man taking a photo on the bow of the boat behind a jib sail

The jib sail is a very important part of the sailing experience. It is a triangular stay-sail set at the front of the boat, typically held up by furling, which allows for easy retracting and maintenance.

The jib sail generally takes most of its power from the wind instead of relying on direct force from the mainsail.

With this design, it can be adjusted quickly to suit different wind conditions or speeds for optimal performance.

While some may consider it to be a difficult piece of equipment due to its many variations, when used correctly the jib sail can often give more maneuverability and speed than traditional sails.

Overall, it is an integral tool for sailing enthusiasts who appreciate its power and adaptability.

a sailboat sailing past a town in croatia

The sailboat component known as a jib has an interesting name with an interesting backstory.

Many centuries ago, sailors would use these jibs to sail around and explore the world. Those same jibs were referred to by the nickname ‘jibboom’. This stuck with generations of sailors and eventually, they began referring to the component simply and solely as the ‘jib’.

Today, a jib is commonly used on sailboats and is a key component in their design. Cruisers rely upon it for navigation purposes, while racers use it to achieve greater speeds when going upwind.

Modern technologies have allowed us to improve upon this centuries-old contraption, but its basic name – the jib – remains unchanged in popularity.

When it comes to sailing, many people wonder whether or not a jib is necessary for their experience. In short, the answer to this question depends on what type of sailing one intends to do and their level of experience with the activity.

For newcomers to the activity, it is advisable to have a jib since it will provide increased stability. This stability can be helpful in ensuring that the boat does not capsize and that complete control is maintained at all times.

A jib is a smaller foresail than a genoa, so might be preferable on a smaller boat. It is easier to handle than a larger genoa sail.

Of course, it is also possible to sail on a main sail alone. It will be harder to balance the boat, making steering harder work and a main sail isn’t always the most appropriate sail for different wind angles, but it is absolutely possible to sail without a jib or genoa.

Ultimately, the decision between needing a jib or not boils down to personal preference as well as skill level when it comes to sailing. It’s even possible to use a sailboat without sails !

the corner of a jib sail on a sailboat

Sailing with jib only is possible, although it isn’t usually the preferred way of sailing if you have a mainsail. I have to admit that Adam and I love sailing on our jib alone in the right conditions.

With some proper and well-thought-out balancing techniques, some experienced sailors argue that a vessel’s performance can be improved with jib alone. For example, sometimes the main can block the wind when sailing close to downwind, and flying the jib alone helps you pick up more speed.

Ultimately what’s important to remember here is that it can be done but that it requires good technique and a strong knowledge of how different sails work together with one another and the vessel itself in order to get optimum performance out of any yacht.

the sail of a sailboat flying downwind with the sunset behind it

Trimming a jib sail is an essential skill for any sailing enthusiast. Knowing how to make the necessary adjustments can make a huge difference between an enjoyable day out and a frustrating one.

It’s important to understand that each boat will be slightly different, so it’s worth taking the time to familiarize yourself with your vessel before attempting to trim your sail.

Before you head out, double-check all of the halyard tension, clew and yard position, runner tension, Cunningham positions, and outhaul settings for maximum efficiency.

Once you’re out on the water and ready to get started, use your mainsail as a reference point and adjust your jib accordingly. To achieve this, start by bringing in the clew until it’s approximately parallel with your boom, then ease off on any necessary halyards while dropping the tack until you reach optimum performance.

Gauging this accurately requires practice and an understanding of wind conditions. With a little patience and practice, you’ll soon know exactly how to trim a jib sail.

the clew of a jib sail

Understanding the different parts of a jib will help you to understand how it works and how to get the best possible performance from it when sailing.

  • Luff -This is the sail’s forward edge. The luff of the jib is attached to the forestay.
  • Leech – The sail’s back edge.
  • Foot – The bottom edge of the sail
  • Tack – The tack is between the luff and the foot of the sail and is attached to the boat with a line that can be adjusted.
  • Head – The corner at the top of the sail between the luff and the leech.
  • Clew – The clew is the part of the sail attached to the fuller.

Reefing a jib is a skill practiced by sailors everywhere. It involves carefully trimming the sail of the jib, making sure you show just the right amount of sail area to ensure maximum power and speed.

Having the ability to reef your jib is also a major safety factor when out at sea. The saying goes that if you’re questioning whether or not to put a reef in, you should have already done it. If you’re wondering whether to shake a reef out, have a cup of tea.

Most boats these days have their jib sails on a furler, meaning you can simply tension the furling line to reef the sail. Then, sheets are adjusted to alter sail shape, maximizing its ability to accelerate in different wind speeds and directions.

Often you will find that reefing the sails in high winds will actually give you more speed, as it will lessen your heel angle and give additional waterline length. The more experienced you get, the easier it becomes to know the sweet spot.

a sailboat sailing past some mountains

As jib is the name given to any foresail that doesn’t overlap the mast it is possible to have multiple jibs on board.

The most common type of sailboat to fly two jibs at once is called a cutter rigged boat. They have two stay sails which could both be jibs. It is more common to have a larger genoa on the outer stay and a smaller jib inside to give you greater flexibility in different conditions.

You could also carry a storm jib which is usually small and made from a heavier material and is attached to one of the stays in rough weather.

These essential sails are usually made from materials that are designed to be lightweight yet durable, depending on their use.

One of the most popular materials for jib sails is polyester, usually a type of laminated Dacron cloth. This gives a good performance but with the durability that most cruisers desire. Additionally, they can be designed with multiple layers to add extra durability.

Race sailors might choose to have jib sails made from something like Kevlar, a really light weight material that won’t stretch (but will rip more easily). You won’t find them often on cruising boats due to the high cost and lower durability of this material.

Conclusion: What Is The Jib On A Sailboat?

In conclusion, a jib sail on a sailboat is a triangular sail set between the mast and the bow. It helps the boat to move through the water and provides additional power when sailing upwind. It can be used alone as an excellent downwind sail too.

Beyond providing much-needed assistance with sailing, this setup also adds some great aesthetics to any boat!

Whether you’re interested in buying one for yourself or just out exploring boats on the water, be sure to look out for what type of jib sail is being used!

You might also be interested in these posts.

  • How much do new sails cost?
  • How long do new sails last?
  • Best lithium marine batteries

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'No one came to help us': Only eleven migrants survived boat capsizing in one of Ionian Sea's worst disasters

The boats used by migrants are often unseaworthy and the smugglers they pay are untrustworthy - and so it has proven off the coast of Italy's Calabria region. Of 76 people aboard a sailboat, only 11 have survived.

used jib for sailboat

International correspondent @sparkomat

Wednesday 19 June 2024 02:38, UK

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Italy shipwreck

The waters of the Ionian Sea seem tranquil enough in the middle of June, but they also form part of the most dangerous migration route in the world.

The shoreline of southern Italy , with its position in the central Mediterranean, is the primary objective of many who put to sea.

Yet the boats used by migrants are often unseaworthy and the smugglers they pay are untrustworthy - and so it has proven off the coast of Italy's Calabria region.

Some 120 miles from the port of Roccella Ionica, the Italian coast guard caught site of simple sailboat, a recreational vessel with a single mast barely peaking above the water.

A map of Italy showing the Calabria region and the islands of Sicily, Malta and Lampedusa

Leaving Turkey eight days earlier, it was packed with 76 people, including more than 70 migrants from Iraq, Iran and Syria.

But something had gone terribly wrong,

Red Cross officials in southern Italy said only 11 people survived, among them a pregnant woman and two children. It was clear these individuals had suffered greatly at sea.

More on Italy

used jib for sailboat

Pope Francis warns AI poses risk to 'human dignity itself' as he becomes first pontiff to address G7

used jib for sailboat

Brawl in Italian parliament leaves MP injured after Five Star and League confrontation

A yacht capsized off Calabria. Pic: Italian coast guard

17 people dead and dozens missing after two shipwrecks off coast of Italy

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  • Migrant Crisis

"Well, 11 migrants who arrived here have multiple fractures, severe dehydration, severe bruises from what they say," said Concetta Gioffrè of the regional Italian Red Cross.

"They were in shock, with clear signs of burns. I have no words for those who didn't reach the port."

Ro'ya Muheidini, a 19-year-old Iraqi Kurd

Sky News spoke to one survivor, now being cared for in a local hospital.

Ro'ya Muheidini, a 19-year-old Iraqi Kurd, said that different smugglers had been involved in the voyage - but all the passengers had been duped.

"The smugglers told us not to bring any food because [the vessel] had everything. After that, we ran out and shared what we had. Nothing was left on the boat, no water, no food, nothing."

Migrant shipwreck survivors taken to Italian port for medical treatment

Ms Muheidini told us that the captain had tried to open a box or tube with provisions but there was an explosion which tore a hole in the hull.

The boat capsized, and all 76 people - including two dozen children - were thrown into the water.

"We stayed on the water for four days and no one came to help us," said the 19-year-old.

"Two or three boats passed by and they got very close. We shouted a lot for help, but they ignored us and passed by.

"If it was not for a French boat, none of us would be here."

Read more on Sky News: French police 'powerless' to stop beach landings People smuggler 'at peace' with dying

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Keep up with all the latest news from the UK and around the world by following Sky News

There seems to be little to no prospect that any of those still unaccounted for will be found alive, making this one of the worst disasters in the Ionian Sea in recorded memory.

But that is unlikely to shift public opinion in the European Union. In fact, it may go unnoticed. The politics of immigration and migration have changed in Europe.

It now requires a tougher, harsher approach, but the consequences of that will prove deadly.

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Yemen’s Houthi rebels launch boat-borne bomb attack against Greek-owned ship in Red Sea

An HSC-7 helicopter lands on the Arleigh Burke-class guided missile destroyer USS Laboon in the Red Sea, Wednesday, June 12, 2024. (AP Photo/Bernat Armangue)

An HSC-7 helicopter lands on the Arleigh Burke-class guided missile destroyer USS Laboon in the Red Sea, Wednesday, June 12, 2024. (AP Photo/Bernat Armangue)

The USS aircraft carrier Dwight D. Eisenhower, also known as ‘IKE’, sails in the Red Sea on Wednesday, June 12, 2024. (AP Photo/Bernat Armangue)

A fighter jet parks on the deck of the USS aircraft carrier Dwight D. Eisenhower, also known as ‘IKE’, in the Red Sea, Tuesday, June 11, 2024. (AP Photo/Bernat Armangue)

A sailor signals a fighter jet preparing to launch off the USS Dwight D. Eisenhower aircraft carrier in the Red Sea on Tuesday, June 11, 2024. (AP Photo/Jon Gambrell)

A fighter jet takes off from the USS aircraft carrier Dwight D. Eisenhower, also known as ‘IKE’, in the Red Sea, Tuesday, June 11, 2024. (AP Photo/Bernat Armangue)

This is a locator map for Yemen with its capital, Sanaa. (AP Photo)

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ABOARD THE USS LABOON IN THE RED SEA (AP) — Yemen’s Houthi rebels launched a boat-borne bomb attack against a commercial ship in the Red Sea on Wednesday, authorities said, the latest escalation despite a U.S.-led campaign trying to protect the vital waterway.

The use of a boat loaded with explosives raised the specter of 2000’s USS Cole attack, a suicide assault by al-Qaida on the warship when it was at port in Aden, killing 17 on board. Associated Press journalists saw the Cole in the Red Sea on Wednesday, now taking part in the U.S. campaign while visiting one of her sister ships, the USS Laboon.

Yemen’s military spokesman Brig. Gen. Yahya Saree claimed responsibility for the attack, identifying the vessel targeted as the Liberian-flagged, Greek-owned bulk carrier Tutor. He described the attack as using a “drone boat,” as well as drones and ballistic missiles.

In a warning to shippers, the British military’s United Kingdom Maritime Trade Operations center described the vessel as being hit in its stern by a small white craft southwest of the Houthi-controlled port city of Hodeida.

The captain “reports the vessel is taking on water, and not under command of the crew,” the UKMTO said. He also “reports the vessel was hit for a second time by an unknown airborne projectile.”

Anti far-left protesters display a banner that reads, "antisemitism is not a campaign promise" next to the entrance where the media conference will take place of the leaders of France left-wing parties for the upcoming election in Paris, Friday, June 14, 2024. Leaders of France's left-wing parties, allied in a coalition known as the New Popular Front on Friday outlined their plan to fend off the far-right from claiming power at the upcoming snap national election. (AP Photo/Thomas Padilla)

The U.S. military’s Central Command also acknowledged the attack, saying the Tutor “most recently docked in Russia.”

“The impact of the (drone boat) caused severe flooding and damage to the engine room,” it added.

The U.S. military separately destroyed three anti-ship cruise missile launchers in Houthi-held Yemen, as well as one rebel drone over the Red Sea. The Houthis launched two anti-ship ballistic missiles over the Red Sea, but they caused no damage, Central Command said.

The Houthis, who seized Yemen’s capital nearly a decade ago and have been fighting a Saudi-led coalition since shortly after, have been targeting shipping throughout the Red Sea corridor over the Israel-Hamas war in the Gaza Strip.

They say the attacks are aimed at stopping the war and supporting the Palestinians, though the attacks often target vessels that have nothing to do with the conflict .

The war in Gaza has killed more than 36,000 Palestinians there, while hundreds of others have been killed in Israeli operations in the West Bank. It began after Hamas-led militants attacked Israel on Oct. 7, killing about 1,200 people and taking around 250 hostage.

The Houthis have launched more than 50 attacks on shipping, killed three sailors, seized one vessel and sunk another since November, according to the U.S. Maritime Administration. A U.S.-led airstrike campaign has targeted the Houthis since January, with a series of strikes May 30 killing at least 16 people and wounding 42 others, the rebels say.

Associated Press journalists on an embark with the U.S. Navy were interviewing Cmdr. Eric Blomberg, the commanding officer of the Arleigh Burke-class guided missile destroyer Laboon, when the alert came in on the attack. Blomberg took multiple calls from sailors on board the vessel, giving updates on the apparent attack.

The Laboon is one of the destroyers accompanying the USS Dwight D. Eisenhower aircraft carrier and both has shot down Houthi fire and escorted vessels through the region. Though Blomberg and others stressed they were still investigating the attack, he said it appeared the vessel targeted had nothing to do with the Israel-Hamas war.

The Houthis “hit ships that are completely not associated or tied to the U.S. or Israel at all,” Blomberg said.

“These are just innocent merchant sailors carrying goods through the Red Sea, trying to get it through the least-expensive route, and they’re paying for it,” he said.

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Like new, very seldom used jib sail. This came as an extra sail with a 20" Halman pocket cruiser. It measures 16'5" x 17'1" x 9'10".

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  25. Jib Sail

    Like new, very seldom used jib sail. This came as an extra sail with a 20" Halman pocket cruiser. It measures 16'5" x 17'1" x 9'10". Sail Details. City. Sturgeon Bay. Sail Grade. B+. Sail Material. Dacron. Boat Type. 20 foot pocket cruiser. Contact Listings Owner Form. Submit. Contact Information. Owner/Dealer Name.