Evolution 30

The evolution 30 is a 30.0ft fractional sloop designed by julian everitt and built in fiberglass by evolution yachts ltd. (uk) between 1980 and 1984., 18 units have been built..

The Evolution 30 is a moderate weight sailboat which is a reasonably good performer. It is very stable / stiff and has a low righting capability if capsized. It is best suited as a day-boat.

Evolution 30 for sale elsewhere on the web:

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  • Sailboat Reviews

O’Day 30

With good performance, low maintenance, and a big interior, the 30 is a good coastal cruiser..

The first O’Day 30 we saw back in 1977 was named Moby Dick . Compared to most of the boats in our boatyard, she did look a lot like a great white whale: beamy white hull with high topsides, white deck, white cabin trunk, and not much exterior wood trim. But what really struck us about the boat was the amount of interior volume. The boat had as much interior space as most 34-footers built at that time.

O’Day 30

With her straight sheerline and short overhangs, the O’Day 30 was not as handsome to our eyes then as more traditional-looking boats, but the design has held up surprisingly well. Today it still looks quite modern, yet more conservative than many newer Eurostyled boats.

Over 350 O’Day 30s were built between 1977 and 1984. During 1984, the 30 was modified by changing the keel and rudder, and the stern was lengthened to accommodate a European-style boarding platform. This “new boat” was called the O’Day 31, and it stayed in production until 1986.

O’Day 31 hulls are numbered, quite correctly, as a continuation of the O’Day 30 series. About 150 “stretched” O’Day 31 models were built.

Sailing Performance

With a typical PHRF rating of 177, the O’Day 30 is very close in speed to other modern cruiser/racers of the same length. The boat was never marketed as a racing boat: performance cruising has always been an O’Day concept.

The boat was originally built in two underwater configurations: a keel/centerboarder, and a fin keel of moderate depth. The centerboard version of the boat is about 500 pounds heavier than the keel version. The extra weight is mostly in ballast to give the two boats similar stability. Where PHRF committees distinguish between the two underwater configurations, the centerboard boat is rated about three seconds per mile slower—about what you would expect for the difference in displacement.

Upwind performance is good. Shrouds and genoa track are inboard, and the hull and keel shape from C. Raymond Hunt Associates is clean and modern without being extreme. Downwind, the boat is slow without a spinnaker.

The mainsail is very high aspect ratio, almost 4:1. Off the wind, this is ineffective sail area, and a poled-out headsail will not provide enough area in light air to really keep the boat moving. At the very least, an asymmetrical cruising spinnaker is called for.

Because the mainsail is small, the boat needs large headsails, and they will need to be changed frequently for optimum performance. With a small main, reefing is a relatively ineffective way to reduce sail area.

Standard sails with new boats were a main and 110% jib. In addition, the boat really needs a 150% genoa and a 130% genoa for good performance in a wide range of wind velocities. With a wide waterline beam and 40% ballast/displacement ratio, the boat can carry a fair amount of sail.

Unless the original owner specified the optional larger headsail sheet winches, you’ll have to consider upgrading if you go to big genoas: the stock winches are too small for headsails larger than 110%.

Most owners report the boat to be well-balanced under sail, but some early boats suffered from a lot of weather helm due to an excessively-raked mast. The solution is to shorten the headstay and eliminate almost all mast rake. This may require shifting the mast step aft 1/2″ for the mast to clear the forward edge of the mast partners.

Although the rig size did not change over the course of production, spars from three different manufacturers were used in the boat. The original rigs are by Schaefer. Kenyon spars were used in the middle of the production run, Isomat rigs in later boats. All the rigs are stepped through to the keel, and are properly stayed.

The standard location for the mainsheet traveler is on the bridgedeck at the forward end of the cockpit. From a purely functional point of view, this is a good location. Several owners in our survey, however, complain that the traveler limits the installation of a cockpit dodger. As an option, the mainsheet traveler was available mounted on a girder atop the deckhouse.

This is a tough call. The bridgedeck location is very handy for shorthanded cruising, since the person steering can reach the mainsheet from the helm, particularly on tiller-steered boats. At the same time, a good dodger is almost a must for cruising, and the midboom sheeting arrangement simplifies dodger design.

O’Day 30

Although wheel steering was an option, you’ll find it on a large percentage of boats. Owners report no problems with the wheel installation. Early boats have a conventional, centerline backstay. On later models, a split backstay was standard, permitting a stern boarding ladder to be mounted on centerline.

All things considered, the O’Day 30 is a boat that performs well under sail. She’s not really a racer, but she will stay up with almost any boat of her size and type, and is easy to handle, to boot.

O’Day was one of the first big builders to take the all diesel route, even though the Atomic 4 was still a popular engine when this boat went into production. Not all of the engine installations in the O’Day 30, however, have been equally successful.

Originally, the boat was equipped with a singlecylinder, salt water cooled, 12 hp Yanmar diesel. This was one of the first Japanese diesels on the market, and one O’Day 30 owner reports that Yanmar replaced his engine—three years after the boat was built—due to a series of problems that simply could not be solved.

During 1978, the engine was upsized to a Yanmar 2QM15, since the boat was really underpowered with the smaller engine. Owners report that Yanmar installations are noisy, which is partially due to the fact that there is no sound insulation in the engine compartment.

As first built, the engine beds were attached to the walls of the engine box. According to one owner, this was such a bad arrangement that the vibration from the engine loosened the beds. Later boats have a molded fiberglass engine bed/drip pan combination, which is far better than the original installation.

With 1980 models, the Yanmar engine was dropped in favor of a two-cylinder, 16 hp Universal diesel. Owners report no problems with this engine.

Engine access is very good, particularly on later models. In early models, a panel behind the companionway ladder must be unscrewed to get to the front of the engine. On later models, a sloping panel in front of the engine can be removed, and the galley counter over the top of the engine can be lifted out of the way for complete access.

Lack of sound insulation is the weak point of the engine installation. It probably would have cost about $100 to provide halfway-decent sound insulation in the engine compartment when the boat was on the assembly line. You can do it after the fact, but not as simply or cheaply. We’d highly recommend this project, since without insulation the engine compartment resonates like a drum.

With the exception of the original, single-cylinder Yanmar, all of the engines are big enough to push the boat to hull speed in most conditions.

The standard, exposed, two-bladed solid prop causes a fair amount of drag under sail, but you should probably keep it unless you race. We feel a folding prop is not the way to go on a cruising boat, and a feathering prop would be disproportionately expensive on this boat.

Early boats have an 18-gallon aluminum fuel tank. Later models—after 1980—are usually equipped with a 26-gallon aluminum tank. The larger tank gives better range under power, despite the fact that the more powerful engines used late in the production run also use more fuel.

Construction

The hull of the O’Day 30 is an uncored fiberglass laminate. Hull stiffness is increased through the use of a full-length molded body pan, glassed to the hull. Construction is basically solid, but is certainly not fancy. Owners in our survey report a fairly standard number of minor production-boat complaints: surface crazing in gelcoat, leaks around mast, leaks around deck hardware and ports, poor interior finish quality. Gelcoat blistering is neither more nor less common than on other boats.

The O’Day 30 was one of the first small cruising boats to use Navtec rod-type chainplates, which are anchored to the body pan. This is a good, strong arrangement.

In our experience, O’Day’s approach to building was to use good-quality fittings, combined with reasonably sturdy construction. The boats generally have pretty mediocre finishing detail, and costs were kept down by keeping the standard boat fairly simple.

For example, there is no sea hood over the main companionway. This may seem like a minor shortcoming, but it means that this hatch is going to leak if you take solid water over the deck. Instead of a labor-intensive full-length teak toerail, there are short, thin teak strips screwed to a raised, molded fiberglass toerail. The strips do not have to be curved or tapered, since they can be easily bent to shape.

Likewise, most of the interior furniture is part of the molded body pan, trimmed out with teak. The cabin sole is fiberglass, with teak ply inserts. You do not buy these boats for their high-quality joinerwork, nor do you buy them for sophisticated systems or creature comforts.

A single battery was standard, as was a two-burner alcohol stove without oven. Propane cooking was not an option. Double lifelines were optional. Even a spare winch handle was an extra-cost option: only one winch handle was supplied, although four winches were standard!

Because the O’Day 30 is a relatively heavy boat, its basic construction is fairly expensive. To keep the price comparable to other boats in its size range, costs had to be cut somewhere, and they were cut in finish, detailing, and systems. You simply can’t build a boat that weighs 500 to 1000 pounds more than the competition, provide the same systems and detailing, and keep the price the same.

All in all, this is a reasonable tradeoff. You could, if you wanted, add a propane stove, bigger batteries, engine compartment insulation, bigger winches, and many of the other things that you might expect to find on a well-equipped 30-footer. But you won’t get your money back when you sell the boat. The price of your used O’Day 30 will be controlled by the price of other O’Day 30’s on the market, even if they are less well equipped than your own.

The standard water tank varies in capacity from 25 to 30 gallons, depending on the model year. On late models, which have the smaller tank, you could also get an extra 25-gallon water tank, which is mounted under the port settee. With this tank full, the boat has a noticeable port list. Without the optional tank, water capacity is inadequate for cruises extending beyond a long weekend.

O’Day 30

Deck layout is reasonably good. There is an anchor locker forward, although its so large that it’s tough to straddle while hauling in the anchor rode. You can walk forward on deck outboard of the shrouds on either tack.

The cockpit is fairly small, thanks to the big interior. There is a large locker to port that can be used to store sails, and a small locker to starboard at the aft end of the cockpit.

With 1980 models, ballast was reduced by 350 pounds in the keel version, 400 pounds in the centerboard boats, according to factory specifications. Still later, ballast in the keel version was increased by 150 pounds. Although these are significant changes, owners of later boats do not report that the boat is noticeably more tender, nor do the PHRF ratings reflect any change in performance.

With her wide beam and long waterline, the O’Day 30 has a big interior. In fact, we have little doubt that if the boat were still in production, O’Day would have figured out how to modify the interior to get three in separate cabins, which has become fairly common on contemporary 30-footers.

For the first three years of production, the boat had a very standard interior, with settees on either side of the main cabin. In 1980, the interior was retooled. The starboard settee was replaced with a U-shaped dinette with permanent table, and the head compartment was shifted to the starboard side of the boat.

The forward cabin in the old layout is bigger due to the placement of partitions and doors, which gave more cabin sole area. With the V-berth insert in place to give a double berth, you could still stand up in the forward cabin to dress. In the newer interior, there is no place to stand in the forward cabin if the door is shut.

Headroom is 6′ on centerline in the forward cabin. There is a molded fiberglass hatch in the forward end of the cabin trunk. In our experience, molded glass hatches are a compromise. They are easy to distort by overtightening hatch dogs to compensate for old gaskets. If dogged unevenly, they tend to leak. It is also next to impossible to fit a dodger on a hatch like that on the O’Day 30, so it must be kept shut in rain or bad weather. Since the boat lacks any real provision for foul-weather ventilation, it can be stifling below.

Although the head compartment in both interior layouts is small, it’s a fairly good arrangement. To use the optional shower, doors to both the main and forward cabins can be closed off, giving plenty of elbow room. Unfortunately, the shower drains to the bilge, a nasty arrangement.

In the original layout, a dropleaf centerline table divides the middle of the main cabin. Four people can sit comfortably at the table using the two settees.

Four diners are far more cramped in the dinette than with the two-settee arrangement, even though O’Day’s literature claims space for five. There’s no way that anyone seated on the port settee opposite the dinette can reach the table. On the plus side, fore and aft movement through the boat is not restricted by the dinette, as it is in the two-settee interior when the table is in use. You pays your money and takes your choice on this one.

Storage space behind the settees shrank in the new interior, a significant loss on a boat this size.

The dinette table drops down to form a good-sized double berth, but because the mattress is made up of five (count’em) separate cushions, this is not a very comfortable berth to sleep on. Its shape is so complex that making sheets fit well is just about an impossibility. In the old layout, the port settee can be extended to form a more normally-shaped double.

Even with opening ports, ventilation in the main cabin is pretty mediocre. There is room atop the cabin aft of the mast for a small aluminum-framed ventilation hatch, and this was an option on later boats. If you don’t have the hatch, you should add it. Cowl vents—other than one on the foredeck—weren’t even options, but could be added.

Headroom in the main cabin is 6′ 3″ on centerline aft, slightly less at the forward end of the cabin. The galley and nav station are the same in both interiors, but some detailing varies depending on the year. Aft to port there is a stove well, with storage outboard.

The icebox is in the aft port corner of the galley. It is not particularly well insulated, and drains into the bilge. There is a deep single sink next to the icebox.

Originally, there was a long step from the companionway to the top of the galley counter, to which a teak board was fastened to form a step. Stepping on galley counters offends our sensibilities, since we prefer to delete the sand from our sandwiches.

Later boats have a more conventional companionway ladder, eliminating the giant first step and the possibility of a foot in the middle of your lasagna, but making it difficult to use the galley counter, now hidden behind the ladder. There is a compact nav station opposite the galley. It has a small chart table, and some storage and space for electronics outboard. The chart table must be kept small to give access to the quarterberth.

You’ll find the electrical panel in one of two places: under the bridgedeck in the galley, or outboard of the chart table. The nav station location offers more protection from water coming down the companionway—which it will—but space for electronics is sacrificed.

Sales literature refers to the quarterberth, which is 41″ wide at its head, as a “cozy double.” Cozy isn’t really the word for a “double” berth that tapers to less than 2′ wide at the foot. Forget it. Many owners have added an opening port from the quarterberth into the cockpit, and this helps ventilation a lot.

The interior of any 30′ boat is a compromise. For the coastal cruising for which she was designed, the interior of the O’Day 30 is spacious and functional, and is probably the boat’s best selling point.

Conclusions

With her good performance and big interior, the O’Day 30 makes a reasonable coastal cruising boat. This is a low-maintenance boat, with little exterior wood. Along with low maintenance, you get pretty plain-Jane appearance.

The boat still looks modern. If she appeared in a boat show today, she wouldn’t look dated.

Unless you need shoal draft, we’d opt for the deepkeel boat, for its simplicity, if nothing else.

The extended stern of the O’Day 31 makes that boat much better looking in our opinion, since the big, fat stern of the 30 is probably her least attractive feature. The 31′ boat is far more expensive on the used boat market, however, so you have to decide how much you’re willing to pay for improved looks and a boarding platform.

Compared to a lot of newer 30-footers, the O’Day is quite heavy, but we consider that a plus for a boat that may sail in fairly exposed waters. For the type of use most boats this size will get, the boat looks like a good value on the used boat market. You could spend a lot more money for a lot less boat.

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Good day to you. I am having a hull problem with my 1980 oday30. I bought it only a few years ago and when i was getting her ready for this season sailing i noticed a small hole where the bilge pump sits so i took it off and apparently ice had formed over the winter causing the inside layer to crack. This allowed moisture to enter and soak a good section of the hull above the fiberglass hull. I am getting conflicting reports how to fix this. Some say take all of the first layer out and re core it and fiberglass again. And some say you can fix the core with little attention to really fixing the problem. I have a hole about 1 foot by 5 inches and all cleaned up but i am pretty sure there is still moisture forward of the hole and near the mast. Ok so i am looking for your opinion please and thank you!!!

I just used Injectadeck. Worked great for a similar problem in my cabin.

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OVERMARINE MANGUSTA MANGUSTA 108 (1998) Usato

OVERMARINE MANGUSTA MANGUSTA 108 (1998) Usato

Overmarine mangusta mangusta 108.

CONDIZIONI TECNICHE ED ESTETICHE ECCELLENTI, MANUTENZIONE JET, EQUIPAGGIO FISSO, PERIZIA 2019REFIT 2010/2012/2014/2015/2016, BROCHURE E DETTAGLI SU RICHIESTA Lo...

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OVERMARINE MANGUSTA MANGUSTA 108 (1998) Usato

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eol 30 sailboat

L30 ONE DESIGN. TECHNICAL CHARACTERISTICS

The L30 boat concept was developed by Rodion Luka – Olympic medalist (2004), Worlds Champion (2005) in 49er Class and Volvo Ocean Race 2008-2009 participant. Rodion has a 35 years’ experience in One Design racing, being a European and Worlds medalist in Laser Radial, JOD35, SB20 and 49er as well as well experience in Platu25, Melges24, J70 and RC44. He joined up together with Andrej Justin, designer of RC44 to make outstanding boat which combines good all round offshore performance, easy logistic, strict one design and is affordable for wide range of sailors all around the World with the price ready to race around 100k euro. The boat has been tested since November 2015. It was developed perfectly in all details. The speed record of 24.7 knots was achieved in rough sea conditions in 34 knots TWS. The boat performs exceptionally in light wind as well showing 2.8 knots boat speed in 1.9 knots TWS. The boat is equipped with Trim Tab that add more performance sailing upwind and facilitate downwind sailing in strong breeze. Two lifting rudders gives safety in survival conditions and decline the foils resistance in light wind.

More details www.l30class.com

L30 Brochure

eol 30 sailboat

Idea and Concept: Rodion Luka Design: Justin Yacht Design

Technical Characteristics LOA – 9.58 m (30 feet) Lhull – 9.25 m LWL – 9.20 m Max. Beam – 2.54 m Propulsion – electric or diesel motor and sail drive with a two-blade folding propeller Hull Material:  Sandwich with vacuum infusion Hull Finish: Gel Coat Draft (keel down / keel up) – 1.88 m / 0.58 m Height from waterline to mast top – 13.15 m Full displacement – 1820 kg Keel ballast weight (lead bulb) – 790 kg Main – 29.8 m2 J1 – 22.7 m2 J2 – 16 m2 J3 – 13.5 m2 A2 – 83 m2 Code0 – 55 m2

Naval architect: Justin Yacht Design

eol 30 sailboat

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Pricelist for sails for EOL 30

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Aeolos AP 30 out of the moulds

  • July 18th, 2021

When sailing enfant terrible Hans Genthe, best known as an all-out racer, announced that he is willing and going to build the ultimate pocket racing machine, many people may have laughed. But Hans was dead serious: Founded his own company in Dubai and gathered a team of highly sophisticated and specialized developers, engineers and designers to come together turning his vision into reality. I´ve had the pleasure to talk to him a few weeks ago on the project itself.

eol 30 sailboat

Now that the project has been set up, a production facility has been opened, skilled personnel has been hired and trained, machines and tools have been acquired and the whole chain of supplies set up it was time to contact Hans for a second time: Astonished of how fast he was able not only to turn his ideas into a real project with hard numbers but also had he managed to build up a yard from scratch in the mere dust of the desert – to step up a notch: His first Aeolos all-carbon hull neared completion. Wow!

Jumpstart of a Project

Lars Reisberg | NO FRILLS SAILING.com: “Hans, it have been just a few weeks since our last chat – judging by the pictures one can see on facebook the Aeolos-project has taken major leaps forward. Tell me about the current status of the build.”

Hans Genthe | Aeolos Composites: “Yes, pretty fast indeed! We have finished bonding deck and hull of our first boat now. It was fast, but we also took our time with it: With ever step completed paused, retrieved to meetings and spent a lot of recalling, analyzing and improving our methods, checking quality and so forth. We had our focus on the production of the templates. To be honest, this effort has been a little underestimated by us. But investing here will save a lot of time with the next upcoming boats.”

eol 30 sailboat

NO FRILLS SAILING.com: “Speaking of the other boats: What is the current status of orders and dealers?”

Hans Genthe: “I am overwhelmed, honestly: We have so many orders and requests, not just people interested, but real orders. It enables us to go forward and set up a toughly organized series production.”

NO FRILLS SAILING.com: “Wow, congratulations! I´ve seen on facebook that some of the major parts of the boat have already been produced: When do you think will be be able to see the first hull married to the first deck?”

Hans Genthe: “As I said, that has been done now.”

eol 30 sailboat

NO FRILLS SAILING.com: “Let´s dive a bit deeper into material and production. Aeolos is a carbon-fibre boat: Why Carbon in the first place?”

Hans Genthe: “I´d say that carbon fibres save a lot of weight in the first place. That means that a lot of energy otherwise wasted to accelerate the weight can now be turned into a lot of extra speed. Besides: There simply isn´t any carbon-made production boat for double handed racing on the market available, despite the fact that I´d say that there is demand indeed. Here is our gap and the chance for Aeolos to find a customers.”

eol 30 sailboat

NO FRILLS SAILING.com: “Apart from carbon´s lightweight properties, which characteristics of this material are also important for Aeolos? Why do you think carbon fibre makes the best material of choice in boat building?”

Hans Genthe: “For me it´s all about weight. Less weight means less forces. Means less material. Means less cost. Means more customer value. I´d say that it is important that the boat is well engineered. Our stuctural engineering partner Solico is specialized in composite construction and brings in a huge expertise, more than a sole boat design office can offer. Solico is working in a lot of markets, and they have a great overview. Due to that we have been able to save more and more weight time and again in every iteration of the project due to the clever engineering. So, to answer your question in short: It´s all about weight for me.”

Diving into Carbon material characteristics and production

NO FRILLS SAILING.com: “I guess the boat won´t be baked as a monolithic hull: Can you dive deeper into the different properties of sandwich-construction and baking process?”

Hans Genthe: “We have a mix of monolithic and sandwich areas, depending on the requirements of the structural analysis. In some areas sandwich is not useful, more flexibility and monolithic laminate prevents the foam from shearing. The keel area on the other hand bears more than two centimetres of solid laminate. All areas with fittings have solid laminate too. For the sandwich we use also different thicknesses. All foam boarders are tapered to provide a soft transition of forces.”

eol 30 sailboat

NO FRILLS SAILING.com: “In which other areas, material-wise, will Aeolos make a difference compared to other boats?”

Hans Genthe: “I know a lot of production boats and pure racers. I have sailed more than a hundred boats myself and I´ve tuned a lot, too. If I compare our boat with these yachts, I am pretty sure we spent a lot more time in the development and laminate plans.”

NO FRILLS SAILING.com: “You are using (at at least writing about a lot) prepreg carbon as principal material. Can you dive deeper into this topic?”

Hans Genthe: “Our big advantage in production is the use of special made prepregs, this is, fibers with resign applied. Thanks to this material you can control the weight of the laminate exactly. With very, very little tolerance. We are using carbon prepregs made by Notus Composites here in the UAE. They develop special materials which we can use more than five days at room temperature before they start curing. That means we have a lot of time to apply the prepregs and the foam very accurately. With pure resin films we can apply additional resin to the foam/carbon connection, which fills the pores of the sandwich and gives enormous strength. All material combinations are tested before in the Notus laboratory.”

eol 30 sailboat

NO FRILLS SAILING.com: “After hull and deck have been baked and checked, I guess, the boat will be fitted with equipment, winches and all the bits and pieces: How will the trial program and possible certification processes be like and what is your schedule for this?”

Hans Genthe: “First we will do the painting: Our Production Partner Nova Composites has installed a huge paint booth for this undertaking to which I am very much looking forward to. Thanks to nearly 20 years of experience and collaboration with the German paint brand Alexseal we will achieve a stunning surface quality. The paint process will take approximately two weeks. Fitting the boat another two. We will do a lot of testing on the water, for sure, too. The certification-process on the other hand has started weeks ago. By the way, our production partner Nova Composites is certified according to ISO 9001:2015. To give you a short overview, let me tell you the quality standards under which Aeolos is produced: Classed as a racing boat, OSR Class B rules to be followed, World Sailing Offshore Special Regulations 2019 Category 2, EC Certification KAT A/B, SWISS LLOYD for design and design pressures, ISO 12215-5, Design category A rules will be followed, means update to Class A is simple. We also have ISO 12215-1 for laminate and adhesive material properties 2000, ISO 12215-2 Core material properties 2002, ISO 12215-5 Design pressures, stresses, scantlings 2019, ISO 12215-8 Rudders 2012, ISO 12215-9 Appendages 2012, ISO 12215-10 Rig loads and rig attachments 2020, EC Certification KAT A/B, SWISS LLOYD EN ISP 12212-2 Stability, EN ISO 11812 water pump out, waterproofness, EN ISO 12216 Windows, doors, openings, EN ISO 14945, 14946 badge, payloads and finally the EN ISO 20240 for the skipper manual. Now, that´s some bureaucracy, I´d say …”

eol 30 sailboat

NO FRILLS SAILING.com: “Wow. Indeed … You stated that five Aeolos units are already sold off the drawing boards and lately announced the start of an Aeolos 45 footer project: How come? What is the timeline for this big boat?”

Hans Genthe: “Well, the feedback on the Aeolos P30 has been absolutely amazing. Some clients booked building slots already. But the design for the AP30 is finished. We defined a boat development and production process, which we apply for our company AEOLOS as standard. Now our marketing and design team is looking for new tasks, of course. The 45-footer is the logical consequence of a market research. There is no light Racer/Cruiser on the market. Handling a boat that is weighing in just 4 tons is as easy as a normal 35-feet boat. That said, bear in mind that most of the 35-feet Cruiser/Racers are heavier than our carbon rocket will be. We want to get the first AP45 sailing in spring 2022.”

eol 30 sailboat

Now, that is quite a task and truly an amazing story to follow: I am very much excited to see the first Aeolos AP30 in the water and under sails, showing her projected capabilities in real life. The pictures look promising, the renderings Hans is posting on facebook on the interior are as well worth at least four more articles on this amazing project. Now, let´s see how Aeolos is doing – looking at the staggering speed at which Hans has come up with this breathtaking project, it won´t take too long, I guess.

You may also find interesting to read:

Hans Genthe on his Aeolos AP30 project

The new Figaro 3, Interview with (sadly gone) Eric Ingouf

Looking at the Dehler 30 OD

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Allied Chance 30-30

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eol 30 sailboat

Jon Eisberg should be along shortly. He owns and sails the heck out of a Chance 30-30.  

I actually tried to message him since I found some pictures of his boat, but my post count isn't high enough for that.  

Post a bunch of stuff in the songs thread, and you will get your count up high enough. I think it is 15 posts or something like that. Then once you get enough posts you can post some pictures of your boat as well! I was going to say I thought Jon has one, but I was not certain. His is a really nice looking boat, so I am sure yours is as well.  

By the way the boats were made not too far up river from me, but it is now a condo development. Shame too, as they made great boats that they really stood behind. I would love to have a boat manufacturer in the neighborhood. Heck I would apply to sweep there floors part time if they paid me with a boat! It was a sad end to the company.  

I'll have to work on getting my post count up and then I'll post some pictures. The rigging is a lot more than I'm use to since it has two halyards for a spinaker (offset to both sides), two for a head sail, and one about two feet down.. or there was one, the internal halyard got pulled through by the previous owner.. Not sure what the lower one would have been used for. possibly a solent stay?  

Jon, I'd love to see some more pictures of your boat, especially below deck.  

troublejr said: Hey All - Longtime lurker, first time poster. I'm a Chance 30-30 owner as well. Going through a refit now. Jon - Actually have seen some photos of your boat on the forums as well - looks amazing and like you've done quite a bit of work to her. Question for you: I noticed you have a dodger. Did you raise your boom to get that extra clearance? Thanks in advance Click to expand...

Hey All - Longtime lurker, first time poster. I'm a Chance 30-30 owner as well. Going through a refit now. Jon - Actually have seen some photos of your boat on the forums as well - looks amazing and like you've done quite a bit of work to her. Question for you: I noticed you have a dodger. Did you raise your boom to get that extra clearance? Thanks in advance  

Wow thank you for all of this JonEisberg. What a great wealth of information. I to have gutted the entire interior, so far just finishing the vberth and laminating the forward bulkheads with formica or FRP, and veneer on the cabin bulkheads. I also removed the head adjacent sink/vanity area and am in the process of turning that into a hanging locker. I'm without an inboard at the moment, so that's something I've been on the lookout for as well. My standing rigging is in need of a renewal but that will probably wait until the new year. I like the idea of adding a inner forestay and running backs. This is really helpful regarding the dodger as well. The traveller is indeed problematic! Again, thank you for all the information and I hope you don't mind me periodically asking you questions!  

Jon, I'd be interested in seeing how you went about the layout of the interior. It looks like you removed the lockers above the port and starboard bunks? Also where did you locate your water and fuel tanks? I am in the process of glassing in a truly structural/water tight bulkhead at the aft end of the v-berth (original panels were lightly tabbed in only a few places). This new bulkhead will serve as the aft end of my new 60 gallon integral water tank. I have the room to go larger, but I am hesitant because of weight. What would your input be? I am also planning another tank in the aft end eventually, which would help balance things out. Thanks in advance!  

Chance30-30 said: Jon, I'd be interested in seeing how you went about the layout of the interior. It looks like you removed the lockers above the port and starboard bunks? Click to expand...
Chance30-30 said: Also where did you locate your water and fuel tanks? I am in the process of glassing in a truly structural/water tight bulkhead at the aft end of the v-berth (original panels were lightly tabbed in only a few places). This new bulkhead will serve as the aft end of my new 60 gallon integral water tank. I have the room to go larger, but I am hesitant because of weight. What would your input be? I am also planning another tank in the aft end eventually, which would help balance things out. Thanks in advance! Click to expand...

eol 30 sailboat

Jon - I liked your picture of your 30-30 in Cruising World this month.  

eol 30 sailboat

I just saw the article/pic too. 'Bout spewwed all over the magazine when I saw your name! Bravo Zulu!  

eol 30 sailboat

Owner of Hull #35 Fling / Silver Fox (NJ) passed away, we have a few sails (6) and all boat cushions at dad's house that we need to sell. Posting on the Sailing Equipment for sale forum. https://www.sailnet.com/threads/used-sails-&-cushions-for -chance-30-30.335935/  

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Sail Universe

Aeolos P30, the Small Sailboat You Can Launch Without A Crane

aeolos P30 small sailboat

The Aeolos Performance 30“ (Aeolos P30) is optimized for single and double hand sailing and works in a wide range of offshore conditions up to category A. This boat is not only a fast carbon sailboat but also a concept for short-handed sailing at low costs.

The boat is very well optimized under ORC handicap rule, but without compromising performance. With the current ORC rules being so precise now, this boat will be long lasting fast all-around design.

The Aeolos P30 is a long-lasting fast all-around hull design for a very nice price. Ideal for short and medium-distance racing and typical Baltic Sea and Solent conditions – windspeeds 12-14 knots average. The CFD calculations proved that a single rudder and a close eye on the wetted surface are fast under these conditions.

For long-distance racing and heavy wind, you may choose the double rudder option. This boat doesn´t follow the marketing-driven design or rating trends. Sure, the rating issues are important and are very well optimized, but not on the cost of hull performance. The ORC rule becomes better and better, and it means producing waste if you produce a rule breaker.

Slip the Aeolos P30 on a beach

Using the trailer will give you the ability to do a lot more races and training. One weekend you can sail on Lake Garda (Italy), the next weekend Cowes week (UK). During a three-year racing campaign, the running costs are usually higher than the costs of buying the boat. The yard has spent a lot of time reducing the time for launching the boat without the use of a crane. 

sailboats under 30ft

This small boat can be launched off a beach or slipway from this trailer. Using the drive-in aids, you are able to put the boat on the trailer while the trailer is completely submerged. The precise cradles for the hull and keel bomb will hold the boat exactly in the spot that holds the ship and securely. After the boat is being retrieved, it is tilted to its transport position. With only 2,5m widths you are allowed to drive on roads globally. The stable tilting device allows the keel to remain in the boat. The low center of gravity lets you drive safe and comfortable.

The Aeolos P30 is ultra-transportable: • mast laying device and divisible mast • retractable keel and rudder • removable, folding bowsprit • tilt trailer (no permission for Italy/Lake Garda necessary) • the boat fits in a open 40″ container

aeolos P30 small sailboat

The trailer has a particularly stable tilting device so that the keel can remain on the ship. With this trailer, you can go into the water on the beach. With the boat, you aim towards the bow winch of the trailer and, thanks to the two drive-in aids, you are placed gently and precisely at the exact spot that holds the ship and the keel bomb securely

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First look Aeolos P30: lightweight downwind flyer

Yachting World

  • April 1, 2021

Rupert Holmes gets a first look at a new competitively-priced Aeolos P30. A lightweight boat which should offer stunning performance, particularly off the wind

eol 30 sailboat

The Aeolos P30 is a competitively priced, but very fast, ‘carbon fun rocket’ aimed at the market for single and double-handed offshore racing, plus inshore racing with a team of up to six people.

It was developed by Dubai-based German engineer Hans Genthe, a double winner of the massively popular Danish 140 mile single-handed Silverrudder race, sailing a Farr 280 .

He has avoided compromising the key concept of a simple and very lightweight, yet robust, boat in order to satisfy the needs of specific rating rules, or to follow popular design trends. However, where it’s been possible to do so within his vision Genthe has optimised the Aeolos P30 for ORC. A heavier version, with a different keel, is also available for IRC.

The result is a lightweight boat with overall displacement little more than half that of some IRC yachts of similar size. Stunning performance, particularly off the wind, is therefore assured.

eol 30 sailboat

Aeolos P30 design is optimised for sailing in the Baltic and on the UK south coast

The Aeolos P30 has been optimised for short and medium distance racing in 12 to 14 knots of wind. The thinking behind this decision is that this wind range represents the conditions most frequently encountered in the Baltic and on the south coast of the UK.

Article continues below…

eol 30 sailboat

Video: Taking the Farr 280 for a spin, Matthew Sheahan discovers a potent 28 footer

At 28ft LOA and weighing in at 1600kg with a downwind sail area that is just short of three times…

eol 30 sailboat

MW40OF first look: An easy to look after, marina friendly foiler

History tells us that unfamiliar Argentine names in yacht design are not to be underestimated and if the drawing of…

CFD analysis showed the optimal configuration for these conditions to be a single rudder, plus a canoe body with minimal wetted surface area. Even so, the hull shape features many of the characteristics we’ve come to expect in today’s yachts, including a reverse bow and chined topsides.

However, overall the Aeolos P30 is a radically different and more slender shape, with proportionately narrower forward sections and less volume aft.

Easy transportation by road was also part of Genthe’s thinking, so the boat has a retractable keel and the two-part carbon mast can be stepped without a crane.

In common with the theme of simplicity, auxiliary propulsion is via an electric drive, or small outboard motor mounted in a midships well that can be closed off to leave a fair underwater profile.

Specifications:

LOA: 9.14m / 30ft 0in Beam: 2.91m / 9ft 6in Draught: 2.20m / 7ft 2in Light displacement: 1,550kg / 3,420lb Ballast: 800kg 1,760lb / Price: ex VAT €84,000 Builder: www.aeoloscomposites.com

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ALOHA 30 Detailed Review

https://images.harbormoor.com/originals/ed773dcc-019e-4fd3-a973-57d1fbbebb1f

If you are a boat enthusiast looking to get more information on specs, built, make, etc. of different boats, then here is a complete review of ALOHA 30. Built by Ouyang Boat Works (CAN) and designed by Ron Holland, the boat was first built in 1986. It has a hull type of Fin w/spade rudder and LOA is 9.14. Its sail area/displacement ratio 19.63. Its auxiliary power tank, manufactured by Westerbeke or Volvo, runs on Diesel.

ALOHA 30 has retained its value as a result of superior building, a solid reputation, and a devoted owner base. Read on to find out more about ALOHA 30 and decide if it is a fit for your boating needs.

Boat Information

Boat specifications, sail boat calculation, rig and sail specs, auxillary power tank, accomodations, contributions, who designed the aloha 30.

ALOHA 30 was designed by Ron Holland.

Who builds ALOHA 30?

ALOHA 30 is built by Ouyang Boat Works (CAN).

When was ALOHA 30 first built?

ALOHA 30 was first built in 1986.

How long is ALOHA 30?

ALOHA 30 is 7.92 m in length.

What is mast height on ALOHA 30?

ALOHA 30 has a mast height of 11.43 m.

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Sailboat Review: The Ukrainian-built, Versatile L30

  • By Mark Pillsbury
  • March 14, 2023

Amid the fleet of 17 new sailboats being introduced to North American sailors at the United States Sailboat Show in Annapolis, Maryland, the Ukrainian-built L30—a dual-purpose racer/pocket cruiser—stood out for a ­variety of reasons. 

First of all, at 31 feet, 5 inches length overall, it was the smallest boat that Cruising World ’s Boat of the Year team inspected . It was the least expensive too, with a base price of $160,000, well below the cost of other vessels in its size range. 

And then there was the fact that it was the only boat that the judges were unable to assess with our usual in-water, dockside inspection. Instead, we trudged past tents and across asphalt, and climbed a short flight of stairs to board the boat, which was sitting high and dry on its trailer, parked alongside the show’s perimeter fence. That’s where we met the L30’s importer and chief cheerleader, Alexander Ivanov, an energized Ukrainian sailor, who now hails from the Pacific Northwest but travels the country, regatta by regatta and boat show by boat show, to help build the L30 Class one-design racing fleet and promote the boat’s attributes as a sail-training vessel and family cruiser.

Several days later, we met Ivanov again, this time aboard the L30 out on the water, where we had a southwest breeze in the 10-to-15-knot range. As soon as we’d finished our motoring drills, we hoisted sails. Ivanov moved quickly from winch to winch and line clutch to line clutch, ­demonstrating the many micro adjustments that could be made by tweaking a multicolor array of sail-control lines.

Hard on the breeze, the L30 stood up to its canvas well and bounded through the chop. With a displacement-length ratio of just 76 (the lowest of the new-boat fleet) and a sail-area-displacement ratio of 32.2 (the largest), there was plenty of horsepower to play with. And, thanks to relatively high sides, the ride was for the most part dry as we cruised along at 7 knots or better.

Later, with the retractable bowsprit extended and the code zero filled—nearly doubling the sail area—well, let’s just say the experience was downright sporty.

The concept behind the L30 was developed by a fellow Ukrainian, Olympic silver medalist and 49er Class World Champion Rodion Luka, who worked with designer Andrej Justin to come up with a relatively affordable keelboat with a design brief that includes offshore performance, ­trailerability, and ease of use. First launched several years ago in Europe, the L30 is relatively new to North America. Last year, Luka and Ivanov ­promoted both the boat and the L30 Class at several of the Helly Hansen- Sailing World Regattas organized by CW ’s sister publication . Boats were towed from venue to venue and were available for charter, letting US sailors trade tacks and jibes with a handful of L30 Class European teams. Plans are to be at regattas again this year as the class expands. Incredibly, boats continue to be built in Ukraine and exported, despite the ongoing war with Russia. The design is also licensed to the Code Yachts shipyard in Hungary.

The L30 is a relatively ­narrow boat by today’s standards. Its beam of 8 feet, 4 inches allows it to be towed over the highway on a trailer or shipped via a container. 

As you might expect with a sporty daysailer, the cockpit is large and open, providing room for a crew of four or five to work, though the boat is also intended for singlehanded and doublehanded events. Twin wheels are located well aft, near the open transom. The boat sports dual rudders, each mounted in a cassette on the stern. The cockpit has no seats, so underway, one sits on the sole or side deck using  removable soft seats.

In race mode, the L30 is rigged with a square-top main and armed with running backstays for when the breeze is on. It carries a quiver of jibs to match upwind conditions, plus the aforementioned large, powerful code zero for reaching and running. In cruising mode, running backstays can be fixed along the mast. As I said, sail-control lines are abundant. But for cruising or sail-training purposes, sheets and sheet leads can be simplified, the main can be reefed, and the working jib is flown on a roller furler, so it can be easily set and doused.

The boat we saw in Annapolis had a carbon-fiber mast and boom. The mast is stepped on the cabin top using a tabernacle. We did not see it being set up, but we were told that the boat can be rigged and ready to launch in a couple of hours. Once in the water, the 6-foot-2-inch lifting keel is raised and lowered with a winch on the cabin top. With the foil up, the boat draws just under 2 feet, and it can be launched by crane or on a ramp.

Below, the L30 sports a ­minimalist and workable interior. Looking through the companionway, one peers directly into a head compartment, offset to starboard. A pair of bunks stretches aft under the cockpit, with a sink and counter amidships to port. There was no stove on the boat we sailed, but it would be easy to add a small cooktop. Forward of the head and sink, space opens up to a pleasant V-berth and sitting area. 

The base price of $160,000 doesn’t include sails or a trailer. The boat in Annapolis, fitted out with rod rigging, nke electronics, Antal winches and a full suite of UK sails, had a sticker price of $210,000, still less than any of the competitors.

The L30’s hull and deck are infused using vinylester resin and cored with foam. The boat we saw in Annapolis was powered by a 15 hp Yanmar diesel. A 6 kW Oceanvolt electric motor and saildrive are an option.

Given its size and accommodations, the L30 won’t be for everyone. But for sailors who have a yen to race, the L30 should prove competitive. When the racing’s over (or for a daysail), the crew can kick back and sleep aboard, if they choose. There’s also something to be said for a boat that can extend its range via a trailer, be hauled out quickly if a storm’s pending, and be stored in the yard in the offseason. But those reasons aside, what got me was this fact: The L30 was fun to sail. 

L30 Specifications

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eol 30 sailboat

Clearwater Beach tour boat captain was drunk on the job, fell off boat, police say

  • Jack Prator Times staff

A tour boat captain stumbled into work on Clearwater Beach, voyaged out to sea and drunkenly fell overboard, police said.

John Beckwith, 53, was arrested Friday on a charge of boating under the influence. The captain for Clearwater Fun Boat Tours had 30 customers on board, some telling police he was so impaired he fell off the boat.

Employees told Clearwater police Beckwith “arrived to work stumbling and had food all over his face,” according to an arrest report.

Officers noticed his eyes were bloodshot and they smelled alcohol on his breath. Beckwith “performed poorly” on a field sobriety test and blew a 0.118 on a breathalyzer, which is over the 0.08 level at which Florida law says someone is impaired.

Beckwith was released Saturday afternoon without being required to post bail. The incident is Beckwith’s fourth charge for operating a vehicle while impaired, records show. He was convicted twice in Michigan and again for an “extreme DUI” in Arizona.

The Clearwater Beach tour provides customers a chance to spot dolphins playing in the waves “while indulging in a delicious ice cream sundae” on a “family-friendly boat,” according to the company’s website . Last year, it was awarded Tripadvisor’s Travelers’ Choice Award, the website states.

Neither Beckwith nor a representative for the tour boat company could be reached by phone for comment.

Jack Prator is a reporter covering breaking news and environment. Reach him at [email protected].

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Drunk Clearwater captain fell off boat while 30 people were attending tour: Police

Captain accused of boating under the influence.

Clearwater Police say they arrested a boat captain on charges of boating under the influence after he fell off the vessel as 30 people were taking a tour.

CLEARWATER, Fla. - A 53-year-old boat captain was arrested and charged with boating under the influence on Friday afternoon, according to the Clearwater Police Department.

Witnesses told law enforcement that John Edward Beckwith, the captain of the Clearwater Fun Boat, was impaired to the point where he fell off the vessel just before 2 p.m. Police say when they spoke to employees on the boat they were told that Beckwith arrived at work stumbling and had food all over his face.

According to officers, the boat Beckwith was working on had 30 people attending a boat tour.

Courtesy: Pinellas County Sheriffs Office

Courtesy: Pinellas County Sheriffs Office

Authorities say Beckwith performed poorly on the field sobriety exercises and provided a breath sample of 0.118 and 0.115. The blood alcohol limit for boating is 0.08 in Florida.

READ: Man convicted 18 years after DUI crash on I-4 in Polk County caused serious injuries

Clearwater police say Beckwith's breath smelled like alcohol, he was unbalanced, and his eyes were bloodshot.

Beckwith has prior DUI convictions in Michigan and Arizona, according to law enforcement.

Officials say the incident is being investigated by the Clearwater Police Department and the Coast Guard.

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  3. For Sale: Eol Eol 30 (1977) sailing yacht

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COMMENTS

  1. Review of Eol 30

    The capsize screening value for Eol 30 is 2.20, indicating that this boat would not be accepted to participate in ocean races. Immersion rate. The immersion rate is defined as the weight required to sink the boat a certain level. The immersion rate for Eol 30 is about 173 kg/cm, alternatively 969 lbs/inch.

  2. For Sale: Eol Eol 30 (1977) sailing yacht

    A beautiful Eol Eol 30 (1977) sailing yacht for sale from Spain, Melilla. Listing id #8497 - Updated Price. For more models contact itBoat. Explore. ... Accordingly, having bought a new boat, we begin to leisurely sell our wonderful battle friend, on which many miles have been covered and four years have passed: EOL 30 1978, #23 (a total of 68 ...

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  4. Evolution 30

    The Evolution 30 is a 30.0ft fractional sloop designed by Julian Everitt and built in fiberglass by Evolution Yachts Ltd. (UK) between 1980 and 1984. 18 units have been built. The Evolution 30 is a moderate weight sailboat which is a reasonably good performer. It is very stable / stiff and has a low righting capability if capsized.

  5. O'Day 30

    The interior of any 30′ boat is a compromise. For the coastal cruising for which she was designed, the interior of the O'Day 30 is spacious and functional, and is probably the boat's best selling point. Conclusions. With her good performance and big interior, the O'Day 30 makes a reasonable coastal cruising boat. This is a low ...

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    Search eol 30 prices - more than 2 listings - EOL 30 1977Designer: Per EgermarkSE: A OceanLOA: 9 mLWL: 6,2 mBeam: 3.15 mDraught: 1.4 mDisplacement: 2800 kg New main sail 2020 new Sprayhood 2020 motor Yanmar after inspection 2023.

  7. Review of Eol 30, data

    Image upload Eol 30. All our reviews are 100% dependent of the illustrations and specific data elements we have in our database. In our reviews we would like to illustrate the following: The boat as such; The saloon; The galley; The toilet; The cockpit; For sailboats: The keel; For sailboats: The rig;

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  9. L30 ONE DESIGN. TECHNICAL CHARACTERISTICS

    The L30 boat concept was developed by Rodion Luka - Olympic medalist (2004), Worlds Champion (2005) in 49er Class and Volvo Ocean Race 2008-2009 participant. Rodion has a 35 years' experience in One Design racing, being a European and Worlds medalist in Laser Radial, JOD35, SB20 and 49er as well as well experience in Platu25, Melges24, J70 ...

  10. Eol 30 for sale

    Eol 30 for sale. View a wide selection of Eol 30 for sale in your area, explore boats details information, compare prices and find Eol 30 best deals

  11. CATALINA 30

    Notes. With more than 6000 sold, the Catalina 30 is one of the most successful production sailing yachts in history. During the long production run of this basic model there were a great number of variations with standard and tall rig configurations, each with a bowsprit option, and also including shoal, wing and deep fin keels.

  12. Prices for sails to your EOL 30 sailboat. Resen Sails

    Below you will also find prices for lazyjack/lazybag to your EOL 30. The sail prices are calculated automatically from the data we have for the EOL 30. Therefore the sizes of the sails can vary a little from ex. class rules or the measures of your old sails. ... EOL 30 boat data. Length 8,20 meter. Width 3,15 meter. Depth 1,40 meter. Weight 3. ...

  13. Aeolos AP 30 out of the moulds

    Handling a boat that is weighing in just 4 tons is as easy as a normal 35-feet boat. That said, bear in mind that most of the 35-feet Cruiser/Racers are heavier than our carbon rocket will be. ... Looking at the Dehler 30 OD . Tags: #carbon, #design, #fascination, #philosophy, #regatta. Leave a Reply Cancel reply. Your email address will not be ...

  14. Allied Chance 30-30

    SVAuspicious. 5666 posts · Joined 2006. #2 · Oct 1, 2014. Jon Eisberg should be along shortly. He owns and sails the heck out of a Chance 30-30. sail fast and eat well, dave S/V Auspicious. AuspiciousWorks. beware "cut and paste" sailors. Chesapeake Bay Eats restaurant review spreadsheet.

  15. Aeolos P30, the Small Sailboat You Can Launch Without A Crane

    The Aeolos Performance 30" (Aeolos P30) is optimized for single and double hand sailing and works in a wide range of offshore conditions up to category A. This boat is not only a fast carbon sailboat but also a concept for short-handed sailing at low costs. The boat is very well optimized under ORC handicap rule, but without compromising ...

  16. First look Aeolos P30: lightweight downwind flyer

    Rupert Holmes gets a first look at a new competitively-priced Aeolos P30. A lightweight boat which should offer stunning performance, particularly off the wind. The Aeolos P30 is a competitively ...

  17. 30 Caliber 245 Grain Extreme Outer Limits (EOL) Elite ...

    EOL Elite Hunters were developed through a partnership with Berger and Extreme Outer Limits TV. Elite Hunter Bullets utilize Berger's industry-leading hybrid ogive. ... 30 Caliber 245 Grain Extreme Outer Limits (EOL) Elite Hunter Rifle Bullet ... Boat Tail. Jacket: J4 Hunting Jacket. Sectional Density: 0.369. Bullet Dia. 0.308. OAL: 1.775 ...

  18. ALOHA 30: Reviews, Specifications, Built, Engine

    Built by Ouyang Boat Works (CAN) and designed by Ron Holland, the boat was first built in 1986. It has a hull type of Fin w/spade rudder and LOA is 9.14. Its sail area/displacement ratio 19.63. Its auxiliary power tank, manufactured by Westerbeke or Volvo, runs on Diesel. ALOHA 30 has retained its value as a result of superior building, a solid ...

  19. Sailboat Review: The Ukrainian-built, Versatile L30

    March 14, 2023. The L30 Jon Whittle. Amid the fleet of 17 new sailboats being introduced to North American sailors at the United States Sailboat Show in Annapolis, Maryland, the Ukrainian-built L30—a dual-purpose racer/pocket cruiser—stood out for a ­variety of reasons. First of all, at 31 feet, 5 inches length overall, it was the smallest ...

  20. EVOLUTION 30

    40 to 50 indicates a heavy bluewater boat; over 50 indicates an extremely heavy bluewater boat. Comfort ratio = D ÷ (.65 x (.7 LWL + .3 LOA) x Beam^1.33), where displacement is expressed in pounds, and length is expressed in feet. Capsize Screening Formula (CSF): Designed to determine if a boat has blue water capability.

  21. Preowned sailboats for sale over 30 feet

    Sailboat Added 30-Oct-2019 More Details: Featured Sailboats (all): 34.3' Irwin Citation 34 Curacao Asking $25,000. 31' Catalina 3155 Muskegon, Michigan Asking $146,000. 36' Hinterhoeller Nonsuch San Diego, California Asking $89,500. 17' owner built Gaff rig cutter Schenectady SCOTIA, New York

  22. OLSON 30

    40 to 50 indicates a heavy bluewater boat; over 50 indicates an extremely heavy bluewater boat. Comfort ratio = D ÷ (.65 x (.7 LWL + .3 LOA) x Beam^1.33), where displacement is expressed in pounds, and length is expressed in feet. Capsize Screening Formula (CSF): Designed to determine if a boat has blue water capability.

  23. Clearwater Beach tour boat captain was drunk on the job, fell off boat

    John Beckwith, 53, was arrested Friday on a charge of boating under the influence. The captain for Clearwater Fun Boat Tours had 30 customers on board, some telling police he was so impaired he ...

  24. Drunk Clearwater captain fell off boat while 30 people were attending

    CLEARWATER, Fla. - A 53-year-old boat captain was arrested and charged with boating under the influence on Friday afternoon, according to the Clearwater Police Department. Witnesses told law enforcement that John Edward Beckwith, the captain of the Clearwater Fun Boat, was impaired to the point where he fell off the vessel just before 2 p.m. Police say when they spoke to employees on the boat ...

  25. ELITE 30

    40 to 50 indicates a heavy bluewater boat; over 50 indicates an extremely heavy bluewater boat. Comfort ratio = D ÷ (.65 x (.7 LWL + .3 LOA) x Beam^1.33), where displacement is expressed in pounds, and length is expressed in feet. Capsize Screening Formula (CSF): Designed to determine if a boat has blue water capability.