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cal 35 sailboat data

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  • Sailboat Reviews

The more moderate younger sister of the giant-killing Cal 40 proves a balanced, capable cruiser. Essential structures are reported to be very strong, while reviews of the interior finish are mixed.

cal 35 sailboat data

When you create a boat that’s universally celebrated as “the most successful production raceboat ever,” what do you do for an encore? In 1966 the Cal 40 capped a famous string of grand prix victories when Thunderbird (with designer Bill Lapworth and America’s Cup helmsman Bus Mosbacher aboard) won the Newport-Bermuda Race while sister ships placed 1-3-4-5-6 in Class D. Coming as it did after three successive TransPac victories and an SORC title, the performance confirmed the 40-footer as the hottest thing around, inspired a “Stamp out Cal 40s” movement, and offered an off-the-shelf way to win in a league where only custom designs had been able to play.

For designer Lapworth and builder Jack Jensen there followed an “if it ain’t broke, don’t fix it” string of racer/cruisers built on Cal 40 principles. Some of Jensen Marine’s many boats (at least 20 models over the years) have been full-cruising “performance motorsailers” like the Cal 46, but the vast majority were racer/cruisers. Virtually all of those were descended very directly from the boat that fueled the company’s success, the famous Cal 40.

Cal 35

By 1979, when Lapworth and Jensen collaborated (for what turned out to be their final time) on the Cal 35 , the world where once the Cal 40 ruled had changed. The International Offshore Rule (IOR) was no longer the only game in town, spars were spindlier, fins were more blade-like, and racing boats had changed a lot. Sunroofs, swim decks, hull ports, anchor pulpits, and cockpit tables had also, in the meantime, arrived to add new dimensions to cruising. The ideal of a “dual-purpose” boat for racing and cruising was still alive, but the forces driving racers and cruisers apart may never have been so strong.

You only need to read the first sentence of the press release announcing the Cal 35’s debut to see that Jensen Marine saw its new 35 as a balanced, conservative response to those forces of upheaval: “She is quite ‘establishment’ in her attitude toward rewarding sailing but quite ‘individualistic’ in her solution to offshore and dockside accommodations.”

In creating the 35, Jensen Marine stuck with the formula that served it well from the Cal 40 forward: “moderately light displacement, waterlines on the longish side, fin keel, and high-efficiency rudder.” To suit the boat to the times, the publicist adds, “In all candor, however, the new Cal 35 is weighted toward high-performance cruising—real sailors’ cruising.”

While she never won much as a racer, she succeeded in fulfilling that “fast-cruising” formula. That is what has kept her alive on the used-boat market, and why sailors might do worse than to look at her as a couple’s cruiser.

“You can’t please everyone.” Almost 100 Cal 35s were built in the early ’80s, however, and as a designer friend of ours says, “Those stodgy traditional looks seem to get better and better the more time goes by.” She’s well-built, sails well, and seems in many ways to justify the premium price that’s attached to the Cal name.

“I sailed the hell out of mine for 18 years and I’ve never had a boat that I loved more,” one owner told us.

Design Nathanael Herreshoff was among the first to design a spade rudder, but offshore racers didn’t get to steer with them until Lapworth came forward with the Cal 40. We can remember the “night and day” experience of our first trick at the tiller of one of the Jensen Marine boats. The helm combined sensitivity and control in amounts that were astounding. “The spade” made keel-hung rudders seem as outmoded as cotton sails. We couldn’t help but notice, however,  that the balance on those early rudders was overlarge—under power they seemed to exercise a mind of their own; keeping the boat tracking with the engine pushing her took full-time concentration.

Lapworth has no patent on the other signature element of the Cal 40—the fin keel. But, married with the balanced spade, it cut underbodies loose from long-keel bondage and opened the way for lift-producing foils and struts to follow. It made surfing a way of life, and opened up the offshore world to dinghy-like standards of performance and speed.

The underwater elements of the Cal 35, however, don’t show much advancement  beyond the pioneering Cal 40 underbody. While European and American naval architects of the late ’70s and early ’80s shaved wetted surface and made their foils higher aspect (thus more efficient at producing lift) the Cal 35 took a middle route, somewhat in keeping with the boat’s “please everybody” mission, with a conservatively thick section, long chord length, and low aspect-ratio planform. She thus has plenty of get-up when the wind is free and strong but is at her worst upwind in light air and/or chop.

Lapworth always championed light boats. Some West Coast featherweights may have been more extreme, but his “get the lead out” efforts were another big reason why his Cals were so hard to beat. The Cal 35, however, displaces just 2,000 pounds less than the Cal 40. Comparing sail area/displacement numbers shows that the newer, smaller boat looks better on the calculator (18.2 versus the Cal 40’s 17.7) but in a racing world where spade rudders and fin keels are old hat, and where the push for speed potential is constant, such a small gain seems very little to show for 20 years’ worth of design development.

Lapworth did concentrate on finer bows with his later designs. The entry on the 35 (and the designs that directly preceded her) was sharpened materially “to help the boat in slop and chop.” The clean sweep of the waterlines, and the flat deadrise aft, make her surf relatively easily, but when you compare her to the virtual planing shapes of her dishier modern competitors, it’s a case of obsolescence at best.

The 35 has a ballast/displacement ratio of 40%. That is robust, but modern racers push that stability-producing number higher. The J/35, for instance, carries a figure of 45%. Despite carrying a lot of lead, the Cal 35, like all the Cal boats, has it encapsulated in a resin matrix within a fiberglass keel. That effectively reduces the density of the fin and accounts in good measure for her performance review as “somewhat tender.”

Another reason why she has to reef before her competitors is that her hull shape, although clean and surf-ready, is a bit narrower and has softer chines than the majority of the boats that came after her.

Cals were never beauty queens. Their aesthetic has a lot to do with function. The short-ended, lean and mean look of the Cal 40 derived much of its appeal from her place in the winners’ circle. The Cal 35 is cut from the same cloth, but, because of her emphasis on the cruising side of the ideal, she has softer, prettier styling than her ruthless forebear.

Her sheer is straight without being knife-edge, her stem is elongated and more delicate than the 40’s, she has almost no counter, and her transom is delicately reversed. The house is broken out into big windows and little ports. Dorade boxes on either side of the companionway form part of her look. She’s as middle-of-the-road in appearance as she was meant to be in function.

Construction When Jack Jensen, a mechanical engineer with little or no background in boats, established Jensen Marine and started building Lapworth designs in 1958, there weren’t many other production builders around. His thought, it’s been written, was  “that production-line construction of small fiberglass auxiliaries would work.” Starting with the Cal 24 (an immediate success) and the Cal 20 (over 1,700 sold) he and Lapworth confirmed that wisdom.

Cal 35

Early in the company’s evolution Jensen developed some of the basics that remained his hallmarks. Rather than use a fiberglass pan as a structural grid or locater for interior furniture, Cal built the entire interior outside the hull. There were some efficiencies with the technique, but the prime virtue was that (once the wooden framework was dropped into place) it allowed access all around the interior so that it could be taped to the hull in a number of different places rather than being left to “float” as it would be in the areas beneath a pan. This building method exposes a significantly greater amount of wood in the bilge, but high-quality plywood and careful taping have kept rot problems to a minimum.

The 35’s hull is solid glass. A sailor who bought his Cal 35 in 1980 wrote: “Mine was one of the very last boats laid up in Costa Mesa. I’ve heard that the boats built later in Tampa had blistering (and some other problems). I’d advise anyone looking at Cals built after 1982 (when the move to Tampa occurred) to check this out.”

Moderate blistering was reported by a handful of  owners from our survey.

The deck is plywood cored. Said one owner of a 1983 boat, “The only problem I’ve had was having to take up a 12-square-foot section of deck and replace the plywood coring.” A number of others  however, report gelcoat crazing at corners and stress points.

Cal decks have been joined to the hull in several ways, but the method evolved with the 35 has earned several owner reports that they’ve had no leaks through season after season. The hull is built with an inward-turning flange. The deck, built with a down-turning flange, is dropped over the hull and the joint is bedded with sealant. The edge is then capped with a perforated aluminum toerail that is bolted both horizontally and vertically to anchor the joint. No one came forward to report deck leaks, though some owners have had their boats for 20 years or more.

One Long Island owner wrote that, “My boat took on major water due to the design of her anchor locker drains, as well as the mounting for the cutless bearing strut.” He concluded that his Cal 35 was “a beautiful sailing boat that was rather poorly built.” That owner’s report, however, seems to be an aberration. We’ve received testimony from a good number of owners who confirm that the “well-built” reputation Cals have earned over the years is well-deserved.

Accommodations Though brochures called the Cal 35 “what may be the most thoroughly thought-out performance cruising yacht ever offered the sailing world,” there isn’t much below that you haven’t seen before. Part of the thinking, in fact, was to redesign her interior after only 50 boats were sold in the first three years of production—a molasses-like pace for Cal at the time. The boat originally had a head aft and galley opposite. “I have the original layout,” says one owner from 1981. “I still think it makes an excellent couples boat. Who needs all of those bunks anyway?”

The “Mark II” version is more standard. The 6’4″ headroom hasn’t changed, but the floorplan has. The Mark II setup offers a quarter berth aft, two settee berths in the saloon, and a substantial platform double in the forepeak. The arrangement showcases a truly well-designed head/shower with maximum elbow room, light, and ventilation. It is sited in the “traditional” spot forward of the saloon. Double sinks on the centerline are another good addition.

There’s a distinctively traditional handling of teak and holly in the sole through teak accents, as well as teak cabinet fronts, ceiling panels, and bunk bases. One owner told us, “The 35 isn’t a boat you’d buy for the furniture—they did cut some corners here and there below.”

As is typical in galleys on boats this size, the bottom of the icebox is hardly accessible if you’re not six feet tall. And, complained one owner of a boat new in 1980, “the icebox is large but not well-insulated.” A second agreed. Though access was a critical problem, he removed the foam battens from around the box and foamed the entire cavity. “I’m very happy with the upgrade,” he said.

The drop-leaf table in the saloon is a big improvement over the clumsy mast-mounted table that it replaces. The electronics storage seems very minimal when measured by modern standards. Ventilation is better than average thanks to the well-sited (for air, not sail-handling) Dorade vents, six opening ports, and opening overhead hatch. The standard hatch in the forepeak, however, leaks. Stowage includes a pleasing number of drawers.

Performance One place where the 35’s clean lines, long waterline, and moderate displacement really shine is under power. The standard Universal 32-hp four-cylinder diesel consistently pushes her past her 7-knot hull speed and consumption at cruising speed is less than a gallon per hour. “I have a Martec prop,” one owner says. “I like it for sailing, but it sometimes doesn’t open fully when I change gears.”

Cal 35

Several owners rated noise and vibration as “very smooth and quiet.” Some  also felt that the Cal 35 “walked” excessively (backed to port) in reverse. “But the big spade rudder and smallish fin give her a very small turning circle.”

If you take the Cal 35 onto most race courses you won’t be as dominant as the early Cal 40s. For one thing, 13,000 pounds hardly qualifies as even “moderately light” these days. In the world of drop-keeled rockets and winged speed merchants you might call something like a J/105 (just 6 inches shorter than the Cal 35) “moderately light.” Weighing in at 7,750 pounds, that modern J has a displacement/length ratio of 135. (The lower the number, the lighter the boat.) Compare that to the Cal 35’s D/L of 242 and you can see how much the whole concept of light displacement has changed.

One Chesapeake sailor who calls his boat an excellent cruiser/racer said, “I have tried to turn her into a racer/cruiser under PHRF. It worked for two to three years, but after the measurers lowered my rating and new lightweight boats came into the area, I don’t feel that I can continue to compete. I’m going to try IMS next season, add a full-battened mainsail, and install a Hall Quik Vang to keep the sail from getting chewed up by the topping lift.”

While there is variation from fleet to fleet, the Cal 35 rates around 160 under PHRF. Neither a “sleeper” like some re-vamped ’80s boats, nor a rocket like the original 40, capable of running away from her competitors no matter what the rating, the Cal 35’s racing success has been middling at best. However, in terms of efficient, mannerly, seakindly sailing of the sort that makes for superlative cruising, this old boat delivers the goods. While her relatively bluff bow puts her at a disadvantage in light air with waves, her full entry helps the boat ride high and dry, especially while surfing down waves. Flat sections forward of the keel can cause pounding, but they are also a key to the boat’s crisp and surprisingly fluid motion. Chopped off at the transom she maxes out her waterline; high-sided forward she is dry on deck.

Though her mainsail is, in the fashion of the ’80s, smaller than her foretriangle, it is large enough to make main- alone sailing not only possible but pleasurable.

Like the Cals before her, the 35 has inboard shrouds to facilitate tight sheeting angles as well as let people walk the side decks with ease.

Several owners felt the need to relocate the pedestal 4 inches forward and install a 36-inch wheel in place of the standard 28-incher. “The Barient 25s that came with the boat were too small,” said a sailor from the Great Lakes. “I took them off and installed 28s.”

The mainsheet arrangement called for a number of parts and what amounted to two travelers, one on the housetop and the other on a horse over the companionway. Several sailors found the set-up “poorly designed” and over-complicated.

Conclusions Whoever wrote the brochure back in 1980 had it right—the Cal 35 is more of a cruiser than a racer. It’s impossible, though, to dissociate the Cal name from the fin-keeled surfing machine that grabbed all of the headlines back in the ’60s.

The good things about buying into a racing family seem to us to include the satisfaction that your boat is, in at least one sense, pedigreed for performance. There comes an association with people who are at the top of the sport, and no company exemplifies the halcyon days of the racer/cruiser (or cruiser/racer, whichever you prefer) than Cal.

Among the shortcomings of this set-up are the possibility that you’re paying for reputation and prestige instead of solid value; that the people at the top are so worried about staying there that they have little time for their customers, and that competitive excellence can sometimes provide a screen that hides corners that have been cut. We don’t think this is true in any serious way about the Cal 35. She’s a solid chip off the Cal block.

At press time, Internet asking prices for used Cal 35s average around $43,000, not including one 1985 Mark II boat offered in what appears to be pristine condition at $70,000.

After changing hands several times, Cal finally folded in 1989. For more on the Cal 35 and Cal boats in general, try joining the Cal owners’ e-mail discussion list at www.sailnet.com .

Also With This Article Click here to view “Owners’ Comments.”

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Excellent and informative. buying a boat ,trying to decide between a 1984 cal 35 Mk11 or a 1984 endeavor 33 sloop “Any advice”

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I've been searching for a small affordable cruiser for myself and fiancee in the 34-38 ft.range.I think I found one in a Cal 35.She's roomy, has a good turn of speed, and is made well.I've been searching various places trying to gather as much information as I can about the boat before making the final plunge.What reviews I've seen so far are favorable.I used to have a link to a website on my pc that gave ratio information on boats...i.e, comfort, capsize, etc.I lost the link when I had a hard drive failure on my pc. If anyone knows of such a site, or has information they can share concerning the Cal 35, I would really appreciate it.  

mitiempo

Here's the Cal 35 on Sailboat Data CAL 35 (1979) sailboat on sailboatdata.com And here is the site you are looking for. But they only list the MKII Sail Calculator Pro v3.53 - 2500+ boats  

Cal35 Thank you very much for the information Mitiempo. It's very helpful!  

JimsCAL

Assume this is the Cal 35 from the late 70s - early 80s. Not the earlier one. My Cal 33-2 is the boat that replaced the 35 in 1984 and is similar in size, specs, construction, etc. just a bit more modern design. The 35 was one of the last Lapworth designs while my boat is a Hunt design. Your take on the Cal is right on - well made, roomy, and a good sailing boat. Good luck.  

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Cal 35 Cruise - Sailboat Data, Parts & Rigging

Cal 35 Cruise - Mainsail Covers

Sailboat data, rig dimensions and recommended sail areas for Cal 35 Cruise sailboat. Tech info about rigging, halyards, sheets, mainsail covers and more.

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  • Sailboat Guide

1983 Cal 35

  • Description

Seller's Description

Standard features

Basic Boat Information Boat Name: Hilton Head Make: CAL Model: 35 Year: 1983 Condition: Used Category: Sail Builder: CAL Yachts Designer: William Lapworth Construction: Fiberglass Boat Hull ID: CABH0055M83A Has Hull ID: Yes Keel Type: Fin Keel Dimensions Length: 35 ft Length Overall: 351 ft Waterline Length: 289 ft Beam: 11 ft Max Draft: 5 ft Displacement: 13,000 lb Ballast: 5,200 lb Single Berths: 2 Double Berths: 2 Cabins Count: 2 Engines / Speed Engines: 1 Make: Universal Model: 32 Drive Type: Direct Fuel: Diesel Engine Power: 32hp Type: Inboard Year: 1983 Engine Location: Center Tanks Fuel Tanks: 1 Fuel Tank Capacity: 33 gal Water Tanks: 1 Water Tank Capacity: 90 gal Other Heads Count: 1 Drive Type: Direct Boat Class: Racers and Cruisers

Extra gear included

Accommodations Spacious V berth forward with custom mattress Private Head next aft to starboard with lockers to port Main salon has L shaped settee to starboard with dining table Full length settee to port with galley just aft Navigation desk to starboard of companionway Quarter berth just aft of navigation desk

Improvements to the hull, deck, rigging, engine, or interior

Up-Grades Bottom copper coated last season.

Boat Upgrades (All New or less than a year old)

Safety equipment - brand new bosun chair, safety harness, and a safety line for climbing the mast.

Fenders, boat hook, 55’ anchor chain, 150’ anchor rode, water pump, dingy outboard filters, anchor light

Wind speed transducer, ITC 5 Chart plotter,

Macerator pump, fresh water engine pump, alkaline water filter system bilge pump,

Solar panels 400watt monocrystalline, solar panel pig tails, Victron Solar charge controllers, Starlink Victron 2000 watt inverter Dc to Dc charger, 400 AH lithium 160 Ah Lead Acid 500 Amp smart shunt, handheld VHF radio, magnetic knife strip,

A/C unit/ dehumidifier

Replaced the water pump, seawater strainer, and boiled out the heat exchanger in addition to regular maintenance. Custom v berth mattress

Rig and Sails

Auxilary power, accomodations, calculations.

The theoretical maximum speed that a displacement hull can move efficiently through the water is determined by it's waterline length and displacement. It may be unable to reach this speed if the boat is underpowered or heavily loaded, though it may exceed this speed given enough power. Read more.

Classic hull speed formula:

Hull Speed = 1.34 x √LWL

Max Speed/Length ratio = 8.26 ÷ Displacement/Length ratio .311 Hull Speed = Max Speed/Length ratio x √LWL

Sail Area / Displacement Ratio

A measure of the power of the sails relative to the weight of the boat. The higher the number, the higher the performance, but the harder the boat will be to handle. This ratio is a "non-dimensional" value that facilitates comparisons between boats of different types and sizes. Read more.

SA/D = SA ÷ (D ÷ 64) 2/3

  • SA : Sail area in square feet, derived by adding the mainsail area to 100% of the foretriangle area (the lateral area above the deck between the mast and the forestay).
  • D : Displacement in pounds.

Ballast / Displacement Ratio

A measure of the stability of a boat's hull that suggests how well a monohull will stand up to its sails. The ballast displacement ratio indicates how much of the weight of a boat is placed for maximum stability against capsizing and is an indicator of stiffness and resistance to capsize.

Ballast / Displacement * 100

Displacement / Length Ratio

A measure of the weight of the boat relative to it's length at the waterline. The higher a boat’s D/L ratio, the more easily it will carry a load and the more comfortable its motion will be. The lower a boat's ratio is, the less power it takes to drive the boat to its nominal hull speed or beyond. Read more.

D/L = (D ÷ 2240) ÷ (0.01 x LWL)³

  • D: Displacement of the boat in pounds.
  • LWL: Waterline length in feet

Comfort Ratio

This ratio assess how quickly and abruptly a boat’s hull reacts to waves in a significant seaway, these being the elements of a boat’s motion most likely to cause seasickness. Read more.

Comfort ratio = D ÷ (.65 x (.7 LWL + .3 LOA) x Beam 1.33 )

  • D: Displacement of the boat in pounds
  • LOA: Length overall in feet
  • Beam: Width of boat at the widest point in feet

Capsize Screening Formula

This formula attempts to indicate whether a given boat might be too wide and light to readily right itself after being overturned in extreme conditions. Read more.

CSV = Beam ÷ ³√(D / 64)

Dimensions for ketch rig. See CAL 35 CRUISE for more details.

This listing is presented by SailboatOwners.com . Visit their website for more information or to contact the seller.

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1983 CAL 35

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Caliber 35 lrc

The caliber 35 lrc is a 35.75ft cutter designed by michael mccreary and built in fiberglass by caliber yachts (usa) since 1994..

The Caliber 35 lrc is a moderate weight sailboat which is a reasonably good performer. It is very stable / stiff and has a good righting capability if capsized. It is best suited as a coastal cruiser. The fuel capacity is good. There is a good water supply range.

Caliber 35 lrc for sale elsewhere on the web:

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COMMENTS

  1. CAL 35 (1979)

    Deep draft: 6.0'/1.83m. Shown here is the MKII version introduced in 1981 with a slightly different interior most notably on the earlier versions the head was aft on the port side next to the companionway and the galley was on the starboard side. Not to be confused with the earlier CAL 35 CRUISING KETCH. (1973)

  2. Cal 35

    The 35 has a ballast/displacement ratio of 40%. That is robust, but modern racers push that stability-producing number higher. The J/35, for instance, carries a figure of 45%. Despite carrying a lot of lead, the Cal 35, like all the Cal boats, has it encapsulated in a resin matrix within a fiberglass keel. That effectively reduces the density ...

  3. Cal 35

    The Cal 35 is a recreational keelboat, built predominantly of fiberglass sandwich construction, with wood trim. It has a masthead sloop rig with aluminium spars, a raked stem, a reverse transom, an internally mounted spade-type rudder controlled by a wheel and a fixed fin keel. It displaces 13,000 lb (5,897 kg) and carries 5,200 lb (2,359 kg ...

  4. Cal 35 cruise

    The Cal 35 cruise is a 35.08ft masthead sloop designed by C. William Lapworth and built in fiberglass by Jensen Marine/Cal Boats between 1973 and 1974. 120 units have been built. The Cal 35 cruise is a moderate weight sailboat which is slightly under powered. It is reasonably stable / stiff and has an excellent righting capability if capsized ...

  5. Cal 35 (1979)

    Cal 35 (1979) is a 35′ 0″ / 10.7 m monohull sailboat designed by C. William Lapworth and built by Bangor Punta Corp. and Jensen Marine/Cal Boats starting in 1979. ... The lower a boat's ratio is, the less power it takes to drive the boat to its nominal hull speed or beyond. Read more. Formula. D/L = (D ÷ 2240) ÷ (0.01 x LWL)³ D ...

  6. Cal 35 Cruise

    Cal 35 Cruise is a 35′ 0″ / 10.7 m monohull sailboat designed by C. William Lapworth and built by Bangor Punta Corp. and Jensen Marine/Cal Boats between 1973 and 1974. ... The lower a boat's ratio is, the less power it takes to drive the boat to its nominal hull speed or beyond. Read more. Formula. D/L = (D ÷ 2240) ÷ (0.01 x LWL)³ D ...

  7. CAL 35

    CAL 35 Yacht: The Extra 5 Grand Isn't For Extras. (1974) It's for 35 feet of sailboat. For a cruising boat that's just that. Not just another racing conversion with minor modifications and major frills. But a Lapworth boat with a lot of answers to age-old cruising problems designed right on the drawing boards.

  8. Cal 35 Mkii Sail Data

    Complete Sail Plan Data for the Cal 35 Mkii Sail Data. Sailrite offers free rig and sail dimensions with featured products and canvas kits that fit the boat. ... Sailboat Data ; Cal 35 Mkii Sail Data ; Cal 35 Mkii Sail Data. Pinit. SKU: X-SD-7330 . Quantity discounts available . Quantity Price; Quantity -+ Add to Cart . Details. Details. 13000 ...

  9. Cal 35 (1979)

    Sailboat data, rig dimensions and recommended sail areas for Cal 35 (1979) sailboat. Tech info about rigging, halyards, sheets, mainsail covers and more. Sailboat Data directory for over 8,000 sailboat designs and manufacturers. Direct access to halyards lengths, recommended sail areas, mainsail cover styles, standing rigging fittings, and lots ...

  10. Jensen Marine/Cal Boats

    Founded by Jack Jensen and originally located at Costa Mesa, CA. The company first sold the centerboard LAPWORTH 24 designed by Bill Lapworth. The Lapworth's 24 sold well. The name was first changed to CALIFORNIA 24 and then CAL 24. The name Cal stuck with the company until it closed in 1986. The 24 was a success and Jensen hired Lapworth to design several more yachts including a 27 foot pop ...

  11. Caliber 35

    The Caliber 35 is a 35.75ft cutter designed by McCreary and built in fiberglass by Caliber Yachts (USA) since 1992. The Caliber 35 is a moderate weight sailboat which is a reasonably good performer. It is very stable / stiff and has a good righting capability if capsized. It is best suited as a coastal cruiser.

  12. Cal 35

    Come join the discussion about sailing, modifications, classifieds, troubleshooting, repairs, reviews, maintenance, and more! Cal 35. 5055 Views 4 Replies 3 Participants Last post by Stede, Jul 25, 2011. S. Stede Discussion Starter · Jul 22, 2011. Add to quote; Share Only show this user ...

  13. Cal 35 1979

    The Cal 35 1979 is a 35.08ft masthead sloop designed by C. William Lapworth and built in fiberglass by Jensen Marine/Cal Boats since 1979. The Cal 35 1979 is a moderate weight sailboat which is a reasonably good performer. It is very stable / stiff and has a good righting capability if capsized. It is best suited as a coastal cruiser.

  14. Caliber 35

    Caliber 35 is a 35′ 9″ / 10.9 m monohull sailboat designed by McCreary and built by Caliber Yachts starting in 1992. ... The lower a boat's ratio is, the less power it takes to drive the boat to its nominal hull speed or beyond. Read more. Formula. D/L = (D ÷ 2240) ÷ (0.01 x LWL)³ D: Displacement of the boat in pounds. LWL: Waterline ...

  15. CAL 35 CRUISE

    A Ballast/Displacement ratio of 40 or more translates into a stiffer, more powerful boat that will be better able to stand up to the wind. Bal./Disp = ballast (lbs)/ displacement (lbs)*100 Disp./Len.: The lower a boat's Displacement/Length (LWL) ratio, the less power it takes to drive the boat to its nominal hull speed. less than 100 ...

  16. Cal 35 Cruise

    Sailboat data, rig dimensions and recommended sail areas for Cal 35 Cruise sailboat. Tech info about rigging, halyards, sheets, mainsail covers and more.

  17. Cal 35 Cruising Sloop Sail Data

    Complete Sail Plan Data for the Cal 35 Cruising Sloop Sail Data. Sailrite offers free rig and sail dimensions with featured products and canvas kits that fit the boat. ... Sailboat Data ; Cal 35 Cruising Sloop Sail Data ; Cal 35 Cruising Sloop Sail Data. Pinit. SKU: X-SD-6140 . Quantity discounts available . Quantity Price; Quantity -+ Add to ...

  18. Caliber Yachts (USA)

    This was followed by the 30, 33, 35, 40 and 47 all Micheal McCreary designs. Years in Business: 1980 - present. Sailboats Built By Caliber Yachts (USA) (Dates indicate when boat was first built by any builder) ... We use technologies like cookies to store and/or access device information. We do this to improve browsing experience and to show ...

  19. California Democratic and Republican primary election results and maps

    California's only statewide political contest in 2024 is the Senate race to replace the late Sen. Dianne Feinstein. Two Senate race options will appear on primary ballots — one for the ...

  20. 1983 Cal 35

    Basic Boat Information Boat Name: Hilton Head Make: CAL Model: 35 Year: 1983 Condition: Used Category: Sail Builder: CAL Yachts Designer: William Lapworth Construction: Fiberglass Boat Hull ID: CABH0055M83A Has Hull ID: Yes Keel Type: Fin Keel Dimensions Length: 35 ft Length Overall: 351 ft Waterline Length: 289 ft Beam: 11 ft Max Draft: 5 ft ...

  21. Caliber 35 lrc

    The Caliber 35 lrc is a 35.75ft cutter designed by Michael McCreary and built in fiberglass by Caliber Yachts (USA) since 1994. The Caliber 35 lrc is a moderate weight sailboat which is a reasonably good performer. It is very stable / stiff and has a good righting capability if capsized. It is best suited as a coastal cruiser.

  22. CALIBER 33

    Given an extended transom and renamed CALIBER 35 in 1992. Updated again as the CALIBER 35 LRC in 1995. Shoal draft: 4.0'/1.2m. Sailboat Forum. View All Topics: ... A Ballast/Displacement ratio of 40 or more translates into a stiffer, more powerful boat that will be better able to stand up to the wind. Bal./Disp = ballast (lbs)/ displacement ...

  23. CAL 34

    41.35 ft / 12.60 m: Sailboat Links. Designers: C. William Lapworth ... Download Boat Record: Notes. Jack Jensen, founder of Jensen Marine owned and regularly sailed a CAL 34. Later versions (2-34, 34-III) share the same hull but with different rigs and other details. Production of the final version continued until 1979. ... Kelsall Sailing ...

  24. CAL 33 (HUNT)

    A Ballast/Displacement ratio of 40 or more translates into a stiffer, more powerful boat that will be better able to stand up to the wind. Bal./Disp = ballast (lbs)/ displacement (lbs)*100 Disp./Len.: The lower a boat's Displacement/Length (LWL) ratio, the less power it takes to drive the boat to its nominal hull speed. less than 100 ...